Italy

Hotels in Italy

Whatever your style and travel budget, you will find hotels in Italy that suit your needs—from exclusive beach resorts to modest bed & breakfasts. Italians are famous for their hospitality and visitors will feel welcome whether traveling alone, as a couple or with children. (Italians love bambini!) There are many famous and historic Italy hotels, which have hosted celebrities, royalty, fashion designers and famous artists and writers. Visitors who want to stay in hotels in Italy that have a storied past should try the Hassler in Rome, where Grace Kelly honeymooned, or the Gritti Palace in Venice, a favorite of Peggy Guggenheim, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway notoriously played a midnight game of baseball in the lobby.) Travelers looking for more rustic charm can rent a trulli beach bungalow in Puglia or stay in a 17th-century convent like the Monastero Santa Rosa Hotel on the Amalfi Coast. For a complete list of the best hotels in Italy see the Travel + Leisure list below.

With more than 500 listings, the Milan-based agency has a formidable presence in Greece, Italy, and Switzerland. Most villas have live-in managers to supervise staff and services. Dream & Charme doubles as a tour operator, so booking flights and rental cars is a seamless process.

Located near the Borghese Gardens in Paroli, the five-star Lord Byron hotel has a standard white exterior and a quieter location away from the city's noisier areas. Each of the 32 rooms and suites at the hotel have been restored in a 1930's art-deco style, but no two rooms are alike.

Colorful lodging near the Castelvecchio Museum.

This affordable hotel offers 10 opulent rooms with Murano glass chandeliers and wood-beamed ceilings. The best part, the property is only a 15-minute walk from Piazza San Marco.

This hotel is for people who have been to Florence before and want to get to know the Chianti wine district outside it without sacrificing easy access to the city.

In 2002, transplanted Scottish restaurateurs David and Catherine Gardner discovered a ruin in Chianti and turned it into the wisteria-covered Villa Bordoni.

In the middle of town, just up the street from tony Le Sirenuse but at one-fifth the price for a sea-view room, the California is the Amalfi Coast’s best budget find.

All 34 minimalist rooms are outfitted with Flos and Groppi light fixtures; beds are dressed in dark blue and bordeaux linens.

At the ultraminimalist Palazzo Soderini, a three-room pension hidden in a 15th-century villa, everything is rigorously white, from the bed linens to the marble-chip terrazzo floors.

Trio of buildings (including a 14th-century palazzo) on the water's edge near the Bridge of Sighs, with new rooms designed by Jacques Garcia.