Italy

Hotels in Italy

Whatever your style and travel budget, you will find hotels in Italy that suit your needs—from exclusive beach resorts to modest bed & breakfasts. Italians are famous for their hospitality and visitors will feel welcome whether traveling alone, as a couple or with children. (Italians love bambini!) There are many famous and historic Italy hotels, which have hosted celebrities, royalty, fashion designers and famous artists and writers. Visitors who want to stay in hotels in Italy that have a storied past should try the Hassler in Rome, where Grace Kelly honeymooned, or the Gritti Palace in Venice, a favorite of Peggy Guggenheim, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway notoriously played a midnight game of baseball in the lobby.) Travelers looking for more rustic charm can rent a trulli beach bungalow in Puglia or stay in a 17th-century convent like the Monastero Santa Rosa Hotel on the Amalfi Coast. For a complete list of the best hotels in Italy see the Travel + Leisure list below.

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The hotel is a “rustic” building (i.e., built in the local style to look like a big, white, very beautiful farmhouse) with a pool surrounded by hedges and extensive grounds with mature, fragrant plantings.

In 1996, winemakers Roberto and Patrizia Damonte bought a dilapidated 18th-century villa near Alba, in Italy’s Piedmont region. By 2003, they’d transformed it into Villa Tiboldi, a lovely hotel with a well-placed pool looking out on a steep hill of vineyards.

The new B&B is a loftlike hotel in an 18th-century palazzo near the Rialto Bridge. The wood-beamed rooms are edgy, but classic: colorful Kartell lights, Venini vases, and Starck Ghost chairs are paired with antique wooden dressers.

Presiding over a cedar- and grapevine-studded hilltop in Italy’s Piedmont region, this monastery hotel has a Caudalie Vinotherapie spa and a restaurant with an exceptional wine cellar, stocked with Barolos and Barbarescos.

The recently redone hotel has 142 rooms that mix original Belle Époque accents (plasterwork friezes; Murano glass chandeliers) with contemporary wenge-wood wardrobes.

For travelers in search of classic Venetian elegance in San Marco, the city’s epicenter of dining and shopping, Bauers L’Hotel has been the top choice since 1890.

The Residenza Napoleone III, located on bustling Via Condotti, has been fully restored to its 1830's splendor. The hotel offers two apartment options: the Napoleone Suite and the Roof Garden Suite.

In Milan, the penultimate manifestation of cool is the Bulgari Hotel. Located in an 18th-century palazzo at the end of a private cul-de-sac, the hotel blends its own 4,000-square-meter back garden into the city’s own botanical gardens beyond.

Long a jet-set playground, Italy’s Amalfi Coast is still accessible, thanks to a handful of affordable hotels that includes La Rosa dei Venti.

About two hours south of Rome, chef-owner Berardino Lombardo runs daily cooking classes at his four-room property using ingredients sourced from the hotel’s 100-acre farm, filled with wild chicory, heirloom Annurche apples, and even semi-wild black Casertano pigs.