Italy

Hotels in Italy

Whatever your style and travel budget, you will find hotels in Italy that suit your needs—from exclusive beach resorts to modest bed & breakfasts. Italians are famous for their hospitality and visitors will feel welcome whether traveling alone, as a couple or with children. (Italians love bambini!) There are many famous and historic Italy hotels, which have hosted celebrities, royalty, fashion designers and famous artists and writers. Visitors who want to stay in hotels in Italy that have a storied past should try the Hassler in Rome, where Grace Kelly honeymooned, or the Gritti Palace in Venice, a favorite of Peggy Guggenheim, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway notoriously played a midnight game of baseball in the lobby.) Travelers looking for more rustic charm can rent a trulli beach bungalow in Puglia or stay in a 17th-century convent like the Monastero Santa Rosa Hotel on the Amalfi Coast. For a complete list of the best hotels in Italy see the Travel + Leisure list below.

Originally founded by Leonardo Ferragamo in 1986 as “Windows on Tuscany”, now with over 25 years experience Windows on Italy continues to specialise in the management of prestigious apartments and luxury villas for rent in Italy.

Fashion insiders love these 28 characterful rooms rambling through a pair of 15th-century palazzi, surrounded by haute couture boutiques and across a small piazza from the fresco-filled Santa Trinità church.

Relax in one of Tuscany's thermal baths at this Bagno Vignori spa complete with an updated image, sleek rooms, and amenities.

17th-century palazzo with a courtyard garden.

Wine tastings, a 2,500-square-foot spa, and tours of nearby towns are just a few of the reasons to visit this restored-villa estate, located on a 25-acre vineyard outside Arezzo.

One of the newest aeries on the cliffs of the Amalfi Coast is Relais Paradiso, opened in 2009 in the quaint village of Vietri sul Mare.

“Spend an afternoon at the private gardens of the sprawling La Foce estate, with magnificent views of the Val d’Orcia.” —Patrizio Fradiani

Nearly every room at this mannered villa tucked into the winding backstreets of Ravello has views over the verdant Dragone Valley descending from the mountains down to the sea.

Named for a type of Italian flour called double zero, this relaxed cafe and bar was once a bakery, and though it has since expanded to serve breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner, and cocktails, baked goods are still a top priority.

Though it’s just two miles south of Florence’s city center, this genteel family estate is set amid the woodlands, vines, and olive groves that herald the start of the Chianti region.

Alessandro Bisceglie and Elyssa Bernard's intimate B&B opened in 2001 and is located just a short walk from the Trevi Fountain and Spanish Steps. Eighteen rooms and suites are split between two guesthouses in the quiet Piazza Barberini.