Hotels in Italy

Rooms have high ceilings and ocean views; don’t miss cocktails at the terrace bar, steps from the beach.

A rustic farmhouse with eight antiques-filled rooms, set in an orange grove on the fertile Catania Plain, facing Mount Etna. Everything from the olive-oil soaps to the pasta (prepared by a Tunisian chef and served poolside) is produced on or around this 300-year-old estate.

Antiques-filled medieval stone tower and addition in a location on the Arno's quieter south bank, near Palazzo Pitti and the Ponte Vecchio.

The exceedingly affable Mary Rossi runs this small, chic B&B in a private palazzo.

If you’re looking for an up-close look at history in the Renaissance city of Siena, there’s no better place to lay your head than at this gem of a hotel, set in a 17th-century Baroque palace called Palazzo Gori Pannilini, originally built by Chigi Pope Alexander VII.

Countess Simonetta Brandolini d'Adda often stays in one of her company's 80 villas—mostly around Tuscany and Lake Como—when on vacation. Her well-connected owner friends can arrange private museum visits or concerts for clients.

On the volcanic island of Ischia—famous for its hot springs and therapeutic mud—and outside the small town of Lacco Ameno, sits this chic, secluded, 25-room inn.

Named for a type of Italian flour called double zero, this relaxed cafe and bar was once a bakery, and though it has since expanded to serve breakfast, brunch, lunch, dinner, and cocktails, baked goods are still a top priority.

Inside the refurbished 19th-century palazzo, the 12 spacious bedrooms are painted in rich ochres and light blues. You can swim in the warm waters off the hotel’s small private beach, or take a 15-minute walk to Ortygia, the ancient city center, with its many gelaterias.

Opened in June 2004, Alle Meraviglie could not have a more appropriate name (roughly translated, it means “of wonders”).

Prehistoric cave dwellings have been reimagined with spare, sleek interiors.

A stone’s throw from both the Quirinal Hill and the Baths of Caracalla, the St. Regis Grand is a respite from the centro storico fray. A perfect merger of historic Roman splendor and white-glove American service, the former Grand Hotel has become a jewel in the St. Regis crown.

A simple cottage built from golden tuff stone was recently converted into this waterfront enclave on Sicily’s rugged, picturesque Favignana Island, a summer destination for Italians in the know.