Italy

Hotels in Italy

Whatever your style and travel budget, you will find hotels in Italy that suit your needs—from exclusive beach resorts to modest bed & breakfasts. Italians are famous for their hospitality and visitors will feel welcome whether traveling alone, as a couple or with children. (Italians love bambini!) There are many famous and historic Italy hotels, which have hosted celebrities, royalty, fashion designers and famous artists and writers. Visitors who want to stay in hotels in Italy that have a storied past should try the Hassler in Rome, where Grace Kelly honeymooned, or the Gritti Palace in Venice, a favorite of Peggy Guggenheim, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway notoriously played a midnight game of baseball in the lobby.) Travelers looking for more rustic charm can rent a trulli beach bungalow in Puglia or stay in a 17th-century convent like the Monastero Santa Rosa Hotel on the Amalfi Coast. For a complete list of the best hotels in Italy see the Travel + Leisure list below.

About three miles from the centro storico (historic center), UNA Hotel Vittoria has a traditional stucco façade that belies an ultra-modern interior inspired by contemporary art.

Large apartments for up to eight people from $850 per night; small apartments for two people from $190 per night; three-night minimum. Book through Roman Reference agency. Agents placing out-of-town VIP’s in short- or long-term apartment rentals have this property well marked in their Rolodexes.

Inspired by Anna Fendi Venturini’s desire to fare casa (make a home) whenever traveling the globe, this enchanted jewel of a guesthouse is the most exciting new hotel to open in Rome in the past decade.

In Milan, the penultimate manifestation of cool is the Bulgari Hotel. Located in an 18th-century palazzo at the end of a private cul-de-sac, the hotel blends its own 4,000-square-meter back garden into the city’s own botanical gardens beyond.

The Residenza Napoleone III, located on bustling Via Condotti, has been fully restored to its 1830's splendor. The hotel offers two apartment options: the Napoleone Suite and the Roof Garden Suite.

About two hours south of Rome, chef-owner Berardino Lombardo runs daily cooking classes at his four-room property using ingredients sourced from the hotel’s 100-acre farm, filled with wild chicory, heirloom Annurche apples, and even semi-wild black Casertano pigs.

Long a jet-set playground, Italy’s Amalfi Coast is still accessible, thanks to a handful of affordable hotels that includes La Rosa dei Venti.

In the Cinque Terre National Park, the nine-room inn combines antique furnishings with kitschy details: light fittings crafted from antlers; bathrooms with starlit ceilings. The best part? Panoramic views of the turquoise Mediterranean from your bedroom window.

Built as a private villa in 1920 and later used as headquarters for American command in World War II, this boutique hotel was carved into the rock face at the southeastern tip of the island.

This 1920's grande dame is fronted by manicured gardens on the Piazza della Repubblica; a longtime retreat for well-traveled sophisticates and a favorite of the fashion crowd.

Grace Kelly honeymooned at this 1930's palace at the top of the Spanish Steps, and it’s still the hotel of choice for many of today’s celebs and stylish tastemakers in search of old-world elegance (Gwyneth Paltrow and Victoria Beckha