Italy

Hotels in Italy

Whatever your style and travel budget, you will find hotels in Italy that suit your needs—from exclusive beach resorts to modest bed & breakfasts. Italians are famous for their hospitality and visitors will feel welcome whether traveling alone, as a couple or with children. (Italians love bambini!) There are many famous and historic Italy hotels, which have hosted celebrities, royalty, fashion designers and famous artists and writers. Visitors who want to stay in hotels in Italy that have a storied past should try the Hassler in Rome, where Grace Kelly honeymooned, or the Gritti Palace in Venice, a favorite of Peggy Guggenheim, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway notoriously played a midnight game of baseball in the lobby.) Travelers looking for more rustic charm can rent a trulli beach bungalow in Puglia or stay in a 17th-century convent like the Monastero Santa Rosa Hotel on the Amalfi Coast. For a complete list of the best hotels in Italy see the Travel + Leisure list below.

Down a narrow, winding road on the promontory’s southeastern tip stands the cliffside Il Pellicano Hotel, a sheltered hideaway that attracts a high-flying clientele (yes, that’s Bono by the pool).

A simple cottage built from golden tuff stone was recently converted into this waterfront enclave on Sicily’s rugged, picturesque Favignana Island, a summer destination for Italians in the know.

More than a few VIP's (the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Catherine Deneuve) have signed the visitor's book at this Portofino hotel. Originally a 16th-century monastery, the property was transformed into 69 guest rooms (16 at the more affordable Splendido Mare), three restaurants, and two bars.

Three miles outside the city center, this sprawling 1960 urban hotel with a 15-acre private park sits atop the highest hill in Rome, offering sweeping city views.

Built over Emperor Diocletian’s third-century baths in Piazza della Repubblica, the Hotel Exedra is housed in a white marble Neoclassical palace dating from the late 1800’s. Inside are 238 guestrooms with high ceilings, marble floors, silk wall coverings, and faux-crocodile headboards.

In the hills of Sicily, 2_ miles from the sea, is the secluded 19th-century farmhouse Mandranova.

Agency: The Best In Italy

Countess Simonetta Brandolini d'Adda often stays in one of her company's 80 villas—mostly around Tuscany and Lake Como—when on vacation. Her well-connected owner friends can arrange private museum visits or concerts for clients.

The 178-room Hotel Excelsior, on the Venetian island of Lido, first opened in 1908, and has remained one of Italy’s top-notch luxury hotels for more than a century.

Built in the 1500’s by the noble Pisani dynasty, this 8-room B&B is known for the original Veronese frescoes in its ballroom. 

Room to Book: The elegant suites that look out onto the garden.

Doubles From $254, including breakfast.

Inside the refurbished 19th-century palazzo, the 12 spacious bedrooms are painted in rich ochres and light blues. You can swim in the warm waters off the hotel’s small private beach, or take a 15-minute walk to Ortygia, the ancient city center, with its many gelaterias.

A beautifully renovated farmhouse two hours from Rome. When we arrived late at night, the chef was still up, and he fixed us the first of many delicious meals. We never saw a menu—we just learned to trust his instincts in the kitchen.

Located just outside the village of Poppi, about 90 minutes south of Florence, Casa Ombuto is a restored 17th-century farmhouse (referred to as a villa) with a terracotta roof, stone walls, and panoramic views of the 80-acre estate surrounded by rolling hills.

Seen from the garden of Casa Talia, the village of Modica looks dreamlike, with labyrinthine passageways swirling down the steep sides of a ravine.