Hotels in Italy

In the Cinque Terre National Park, the nine-room inn combines antique furnishings with kitschy details: light fittings crafted from antlers; bathrooms with starlit ceilings. The best part? Panoramic views of the turquoise Mediterranean from your bedroom window.

Overlooking the celebrated shopping street Via della Spiga, home to Dolce & Gabbana and Prada, the Carlton Hotel Baglioni offers five-star comfort in 92 rooms and suites decorated in warm-toned silk tapestries, Murano glass chandeliers, and antique furniture.

Built as a private villa in 1920 and later used as headquarters for American command in World War II, this boutique hotel was carved into the rock face at the southeastern tip of the island.

Call it a kind of pastoral demonstration project: parts of the property are used to raise endangered breeds of livestock, while others yield sustainably harvested wood for heating.

Recently renovated and expanded with four new suites, the property was originally built as a mansion in 1532 and has been run as a hotel by the same family since 1879. Each of the 10 rooms retains elements of the palazzo’s past—ours had 20-foot beamed ceilings and 17th-century frescoed walls.

Originally built as the Hotel de la Paix (Hotel of Peace) for Italy’s National Exhibition of 1891, this Art Nouveau landmark is one of Palermo’s oldest hotels. Situated in the commercial center, the hotel is sandwiched between the Giardino Inglese (English Garden) and the Villa Trabia park.

Italy’s style capital is buzzing with the news of its first hotel from a homegrown fashion house.

Famed hotelier Rocco Forte’s sister, Olga Polizzi, overhauled the storied Savoy's 102 rooms in a contemporary mix of snowy linens, dark wood furnishings, bright scatter cushions, and quirky pictures of shoes—a nod to the fact that Ferragamo actually owns the walls of this 19th- century palazzo on