Italy

Hotels in Italy

Call it a kind of pastoral demonstration project: parts of the property are used to raise endangered breeds of livestock, while others yield sustainably harvested wood for heating.

Originally built as the Hotel de la Paix (Hotel of Peace) for Italy’s National Exhibition of 1891, this Art Nouveau landmark is one of Palermo’s oldest hotels. Situated in the commercial center, the hotel is sandwiched between the Giardino Inglese (English Garden) and the Villa Trabia park.

A patrician villa that retains the charm of a private residence. Divers will love the sea life in the marine preserve nearby. 

Room to Book: Superior Sea View rooms, with French balcony and Deluxe Sea View rooms, with terrace or balcony

In an area known for tradition, this cliffside hotel in Praiano displays a surprising amount of modern design.

A charming 18th-century villa amid olive and almond groves. The owners— husband and wife Ron and Lesley Simon—restored the property to its former splendor, with four antiques-filled rooms.

A temple to feng shui, renewable energy, and biodynamic agriculture.

Nothing beats Le Sirenuse for traditional, dignified luxury.

Opened in 2008, this restored 16th century palazzo sits on what might be most beautiful street in Italy. The 64 rooms and suites range from the most perfect single room we’ve seen to family suites measuring upwards of 600 sq ft.

An abbey stands on a hilltop overlooking the town of Castelbuono in northern Sicily. Eight centuries ago it was full of Benedictine monks, but today it's the Relais Santa Anastasia, hosting guests in 25 rooms and three suites behind its thick, stone walls.

Alongside the bay of Naples, this carefully designed boutique hotel by British owner Michelle Lowe is located on the second floor of a 17th-century palace, with eight rooms constructed from natural wood, linen, and stone—predominantly polished white limestone.

If Piedmont’s Slow Food movement has meant better eating for everyone, an unexpected consequence has been the increased popularity of this once sleepy corner of western Italy. Which is why LaVilla, just east of the town of Le Langhe, is such a welcome addition.

Staying in the 18th-century Villa Olmi Resort—surrounded by expansive green acres just 10 minutes from Florence’s Duomo—means not having to choose between city and country.

The olive-oil maker Armando Manni’s one-bedroom Casa Manni Roma is an Adam Tihany–designed space overlooking the Piazza Colonna.