Italy

Hotels in Italy

Whatever your style and travel budget, you will find hotels in Italy that suit your needs—from exclusive beach resorts to modest bed & breakfasts. Italians are famous for their hospitality and visitors will feel welcome whether traveling alone, as a couple or with children. (Italians love bambini!) There are many famous and historic Italy hotels, which have hosted celebrities, royalty, fashion designers and famous artists and writers. Visitors who want to stay in hotels in Italy that have a storied past should try the Hassler in Rome, where Grace Kelly honeymooned, or the Gritti Palace in Venice, a favorite of Peggy Guggenheim, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway notoriously played a midnight game of baseball in the lobby.) Travelers looking for more rustic charm can rent a trulli beach bungalow in Puglia or stay in a 17th-century convent like the Monastero Santa Rosa Hotel on the Amalfi Coast. For a complete list of the best hotels in Italy see the Travel + Leisure list below.

Seen from the garden of Casa Talia, the village of Modica looks dreamlike, with labyrinthine passageways swirling down the steep sides of a ravine.

Five hundred and seventy acres on Sicily’s southwestern coast have been shaped into a golf resort with the subtle, undeniable luxury we’ve come to expect from the Rocco Forte Collection. Every room has an unencumbered sea view (a non-putter might never know there are two 18-hole courses).

Quiet inn minutes from central Lucca.

This hotel—an updated 19th-century palazzo with 122 rooms and phenomenal terraced gardens set between Piazza del Popolo and the Spanish Steps—makes sophistication look easy.

This magnificent grande dame of a hotel is the premier resort on Capri, with 55 rooms and suites that offer sweeping postcard views over the Bay of Naples, the hotel gardens, or the volcanic isle of Ischia.

Design students can take several lessons at this unique boutique hotel by Florentine architect Guido Ciompi just north of the duomo.

A beautifully renovated farmhouse two hours from Rome. When we arrived late at night, the chef was still up, and he fixed us the first of many delicious meals. We never saw a menu—we just learned to trust his instincts in the kitchen.

Ideal for visitors seeking a more intimate stay in Rome, this largely unknown bed-and-breakfast provides accommodations for small groups in a 16th-century palazzo built for the noble Alibrandi family.

The 47-room La Coluccia—near the small town of Santa Teresa di Gallura—is ideal for couples craving undisturbed beach time. The stretch of sand alongside the hotel is so remote, there's no danger of guests getting distracted by Sardinia's famously high-octane social life.