Italy

Hotels in Italy

Whatever your style and travel budget, you will find hotels in Italy that suit your needs—from exclusive beach resorts to modest bed & breakfasts. Italians are famous for their hospitality and visitors will feel welcome whether traveling alone, as a couple or with children. (Italians love bambini!) There are many famous and historic Italy hotels, which have hosted celebrities, royalty, fashion designers and famous artists and writers. Visitors who want to stay in hotels in Italy that have a storied past should try the Hassler in Rome, where Grace Kelly honeymooned, or the Gritti Palace in Venice, a favorite of Peggy Guggenheim, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway notoriously played a midnight game of baseball in the lobby.) Travelers looking for more rustic charm can rent a trulli beach bungalow in Puglia or stay in a 17th-century convent like the Monastero Santa Rosa Hotel on the Amalfi Coast. For a complete list of the best hotels in Italy see the Travel + Leisure list below.

It may be a 20-minute walk to the Spanish Steps, but the Parco dei Principi setting, tucked away beside Rome’s biggest park, Villa Borghese, means fewer tourists and less traffic for arriving travelers who prefer quieter hotels in residential neighborhoods to the city’s more typical hotel cluster

Eyebrows were raised when London- based designer Ron Arad, known for his sinuous metal furniture, announced plans for a hotel in the Italian seaside resort of Rimini, an hour east of Bologna on the Adriatic coast.

The hotel's bar is perched on a bluff overlooking the town and possesses a slightly askew, old-school charm.

Intimate property—just 30 rooms—on one of the most peaceful stretches of the Italian island. 



The sun-filled island of Sicily has both historic cache and an emerging arts-and-culture scene, and a stay at Donnafugata Golf Resort & Spa, in Ragusa province, makes for a serene home base.

When the Marquis and Marchioness Paterno’ Castello di San Giuliano returned to their ancestral home in Sicily after years abroad, they renovated their villa that had stood empty 100 years.

With both Rome and the countryside of the region known as Castelli Romani at your doorstep, the small province of Grottaferrata (just 15 miles from the city center) is the perfect enclave for those who have already thrown three coins in the Trevi Fountain.

The original grande dame of Amalfi Coast hotels still reigns in Belle Époque splendor on the coastal road just outside the town of Amalfi.

Students of contemporary design especially love the industrial cool zeitgeist of this hotel less than a block from the duomo. The façade may be 1800, but the interior is total avant-garde with a penchant for black slate, burnished brass, copper paneling, and concrete walls.

The 10 exceptionally tranquil rooms at this year-old boutique hotel offer outstanding value for the amenities and location: a vine-covered alley off antiques thoroughfare Via dei Coronari.

Recently renovated and expanded with four new suites, the property was originally built as a mansion in 1532 and has been run as a hotel by the same family since 1879. Each of the 10 rooms retains elements of the palazzo’s past—ours had 20-foot beamed ceilings and 17th-century frescoed walls.

Housed in a 15th-century palazzo that was originally a convent, Hotel Monna Lisais located in the city's Piazza Della Signoria. Hotel features include a lush courtyard with a fountain, art-filled common areas with vaulted ceilings, and antique reproductions (and some real antiques) throughout.