Italy

Things to do in Italy

There are endless possibilities for things to do in Italy. As the seat of Western Civilization, there are many museums and historical sites that are not to be missed. The ruins from the Roman Empire can be seen across the land, but nowhere as well as in Rome itself. Standing inside the Coliseum as the sun sets over the City of Seven Hills is an experience not soon forgotten. There are many beautiful ecclesiastical sites—the foremost being the illustrious Vatican, seat of power for the Catholic Church and former Holy Roman Empire. It’s worth a visit to admire St. Peter’s Basilica and gaze at the frescoed ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

If you are wondering what to do in Italy for shopping—look no further than the cobblestone streets of Via de' Tornabuoni in Florence. Stroll through the designer shops and save an hour for a turn through the Ferragamo Museum before hitting the picturesque Ponte Vecchio. For high fashion, Milan is the go-to city, especially during fashion week when models and designers arrive in droves to roam the streets in their seasonal finery.

There are many outdoor things to do in Italy, from stunning beaches to gorgeous hikes and bike rides through vineyards and olive groves. Check out the Travel + Leisure guide to discover what to do in Italy.

The name says it all: this shop is Candyland for mid-century-design freaks. You’ll find furniture, ceramics, glassware, lamps, jewelry, and other home accessories from the 1940’s to the 1970’s from Italian, Scandinavian, British, and American design firms.

San Crispino gelato—considered by many locals to be the best in Rome—is made and served under exacting conditions.

A complex of museums and galleries founded by popes Clement XIV and Pius VI, the Vatican Museums contain a wealth of historical items and artistic works in the form of archeological findings, sculptures, mosaics, statue, and frescoes.

The only place where one can purchase women's clothes by Anna Fabiano, the former Fiorucci designer's store is located in Milan's trendy Porta Ticinese neighborhood.

The museum houses ancient artifacts, including the Coppa di Nestore (mentioned in Homer's Iliad), from the ancient Greek settlement of Pithecusae.

Serious collectors come for paintings and sculptures by top contemporary inter- national artists such as Toots Zynsky and Silvia Levenson.

The outstanding private collection of the noble Borghese family went public when they lost their fortune in the late 1800’s; today it’s the world’s most perfect small art museum.

Part of a European chain, this blue-walled express spa is great if you need a quick beauty fix.

Angiolini's three modernized palazzi carry the latest looks from Gucci, Prada, and Marni, along with niche labels, such as Dosa and Haute by Vincenzo De Cotiis.

Avallone is located in the middle of downtown Vietri sul Mare, a coastal town known for its production of handcrafted ceramic tiles and tableware. The tiled exterior of the shop has depictions of ancient hunters, grape harvesters, and a winemaking scene.

Wander round the verdant pathways of the open-air sculpture park on the hillside above the port; it's home to works by more than 100 contemporary artists, from Giò Pomodoro to Lucio Fontana.

This 17th century villa stakes claim in the largest landscaped public park in Rome. Situated just outside Porta San Pancrazio, it was known as Bel Respiro, or “beautiful breath,” for its panoramic views of the city.

A gallery-café featuring rising and established names such as 1970's Pop artist Mario Schifano.

Originally commissioned as a synagogue to celebrate the emancipation of non-Catholic religions under Victor Emmanuel II, the Mole eventually grew too expensive for its patrons and was purchased by the state.