Italy

Italy Travel Guide

Where does one begin with Italy? Italy is the land of mouthwatering meals that last all night, heady wines to drink underneath olive trees, pastel villas built into sheer cliffs above the crystal blue Tyrrhenian Sea, and Renaissance paintings and marble sculptures that leave you awestruck and inspired. It is everyone’s dream to travel to Italy, and for good reason. Whether you are heading to the beach or to the mountains, to the vineyards or to the cities, there are endless possibilities for exciting Italy travel. Check out Travel + Leisure’s Italy travel guide to decide what to eat, where to stay and what to see.

A good place to start is the capital city of Rome, the birthplace of Western civilization and the site of many epic historical events. All the regions of Italy are different and cater to different kinds of vacations—from skiing in the Dolomites to sunning on the Aeolian Islands.

Things Not to Miss in Italy

• Take a gondola along the canals in Venice
 • Climb to the top of the Duomo in Florence
 • Tour the volcanic city of Pompeii
 • Hike through the five cities of Cinque Terre
 • Swim in the Blue Grotto on Capri
 • Take a bike tour through the vineyards of Tuscany
 • Catch an opera performance at Teatro Massimo in Palermo

When to Go to Italy

Italy’s Mediterranean climate makes it a year-round destination with thrilling activities for every season. In general, the summers are hot and dry, and the winters are cold and damp. In general, the best months to visit Italy are April to June and September to October when the weather is comfortably warm. July and August can be stiflingly hot and muggy, and most Italians go on holiday in August, shuttering many shops and restaurants.

Articles about Italy

Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
Greg Seider’s rules to cocktail-making boil down to one simple but paramount ingredient: inspiration. The peripatetic barman—who earlier this month spoke on the ills of the mixology trend—finds it in disparate places around the world. It pops up o...
How many of us have sat staring at a Wes Anderson film—be it Grand Budapest Hotel, Moonrise Kingdom, The Royal Tenenbaums, or even The Fantastic Mr. Fox—and wondered desperately “Why can’t my life look like that?” Turns out it can, now that Bar Lu...
Two men in Cremona, Italy are facing vandalism charges for severely damaging a the city’s Statua dei due Ercole (Statue of Two Hercules). While climbing (climbing!) the 18th-century statue, the tourists, whose nationalities remain unknown, managed...