Israel

Israel Travel Guide

While it's easy to fill your entire list of things to do in Israel with sacred sites, there are plenty of contemporary and secular hotspots that are worth a visit. Here are some fun options:
Ein Gedi National Park. This park in the Dead Sea area is home to balsam plants, native wildlife and an ancient synagogue with mysterious inscriptions. 
Shop the Souks. Israel has a number of festive open-air market markets—such as Carmel Market in Tel Aviv, the Jaffa Flea Market and Jerusalem's Old City Market (or souk)—selling beads, sandals, rugs, vintage clothes and plenty of snacks.
Snorkeling in the Red Sea. The coral reefs of Eilat make for some colorful marine life sightseeing, even for beginners.
Winery Tours. Certainly, Israel's wine culture has been around longer than France's or California's, and exploring the newer operations is a fascinating option for foodies wondering what to do in Israel on a day trip. Some of the top wineries these days include Galil Mountain Winery and Na'aman Winery.

The latest addition to the Tel Aviv art scene.

Wedged into a tight, triangular site within the city’s central cultural complex, this piece of architectural origami uses a soaring, twisting, 87-foot-tall atrium, called Lightfall, to link a series of refreshingly uncomplicated galleries.

Israel has a new cultural icon—the Design Museum Holon, created by Ron Arad and home to a rotating exhibition of international furniture, product, and industrial designs.

An 1898 Lutheran church around the corner from the better-known Church of the Holy Sepulcher. While the latter is dark and mysterious, the Redeemer is inspired by light. To see where Old City meets new, climb the 186 stairs to the top of its tower.

The Bauhaus Foundation Museum, housing original furniture and other designs by the likes of miens van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, opened in April on Bialik Street.

Israeli restaurants and wineries set up booths in Hayarkan Park to showcase delicacies in the annual Taste of Tel Aviv festival.

The residence of the late Nobel Prize-winning writer Shmuel Yosef Agnon in Talpiot.

In the emerging Noga district, this boutique sells funky housewares, including signature "lamp dresses"-lights covered in Mondrian-inspired frock-shaped mylar paper shells.

The Russian nerve center of Allenby Street is full of curious pensioners and boulevard intellectuals feasting on a lifetime’s worth of Isaac Asimov’s science fiction, Russian translations of the kabbalah, and an illustrated Hebrew-Russian version of Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, which is pres

Run by siblings Nimrod Zaltsman and hilla Wenkert, six-month-old olive oil boutique, Olia, stocks regionally sourced products such as olive tapenade infused with Parmesan cheese.

A neo-Georgian supper club, a place where one can order a cool
pomegranate vodka drink, featuring grenadine juice from Russia and
crushed ice, or a frozen margarita made with native arak liquor,
almonds, and rose juice. The décor is mellow and cozy like a shabby