Israel Travel Guide

Jerusalem’s labyrinthine open-air market, Mahane Yehuda—also referred to as the “shuk”—is located between Jaffa Road and Agrippas Street. It is the largest and busiest outdoor market in all of Israel and is always full, even the day after a terrorist attack.

A chic retail and gallery space.

Tel Aviv's lively old quarter.

Housed in a former train station, Made in TLV stocks a sleek range of design books, tabletop pieces, candles, and photographs.

An over-the-top underwater restaurant and bar off the coast of Israel begins to make sense when you learn that the nearby city of Eilat is Israel’s version of Dubai.

The latest addition to the Tel Aviv art scene.

Wedged into a tight, triangular site within the city’s central cultural complex, this piece of architectural origami uses a soaring, twisting, 87-foot-tall atrium, called Lightfall, to link a series of refreshingly uncomplicated galleries.

Israel has a new cultural icon—the Design Museum Holon, created by Ron Arad and home to a rotating exhibition of international furniture, product, and industrial designs.

An 1898 Lutheran church around the corner from the better-known Church of the Holy Sepulcher. While the latter is dark and mysterious, the Redeemer is inspired by light. To see where Old City meets new, climb the 186 stairs to the top of its tower.