Israel

Things to do in Israel

While it's easy to fill your entire list of things to do in Israel with sacred sites, there are plenty of contemporary and secular hotspots that are worth a visit. Here are some fun options:
Ein Gedi National Park. This park in the Dead Sea area is home to balsam plants, native wildlife and an ancient synagogue with mysterious inscriptions. 
Shop the Souks. Israel has a number of festive open-air market markets—such as Carmel Market in Tel Aviv, the Jaffa Flea Market and Jerusalem's Old City Market (or souk)—selling beads, sandals, rugs, vintage clothes and plenty of snacks.
Snorkeling in the Red Sea. The coral reefs of Eilat make for some colorful marine life sightseeing, even for beginners.
Winery Tours. Certainly, Israel's wine culture has been around longer than France's or California's, and exploring the newer operations is a fascinating option for foodies wondering what to do in Israel on a day trip. Some of the top wineries these days include Galil Mountain Winery and Na'aman Winery.

Follow in the steps of Mary Magdalene, Miriam, and Queen Helena. Other itineraries highlight Holy Land favorites: the Garden of Gethsemane and the Dome of the Rock.

Talents Design showcases works by such up-and-coming Israeli designers as Dor Carmon. Best finds: orchid-shaped couches and earthy stone tables.

A chic retail and gallery space.

An over-the-top underwater restaurant and bar off the coast of Israel begins to make sense when you learn that the nearby city of Eilat is Israel’s version of Dubai.

Israel has a new cultural icon—the Design Museum Holon, created by Ron Arad and home to a rotating exhibition of international furniture, product, and industrial designs.

The Bauhaus Foundation Museum, housing original furniture and other designs by the likes of miens van der Rohe and Marcel Breuer, opened in April on Bialik Street.

The Russian nerve center of Allenby Street is full of curious pensioners and boulevard intellectuals feasting on a lifetime’s worth of Isaac Asimov’s science fiction, Russian translations of the kabbalah, and an illustrated Hebrew-Russian version of Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, which is pres

Two Georgian brothers have opened a sparkling boutique, Babar, that carries cheese from all over the world as well as wines and olive oils from Israel—seven different types of olive oil from one kibbutz alone.

Great stop for a strong cup of coffee.