Israel

Things to do in Israel

While it's easy to fill your entire list of things to do in Israel with sacred sites, there are plenty of contemporary and secular hotspots that are worth a visit. Here are some fun options:
Ein Gedi National Park. This park in the Dead Sea area is home to balsam plants, native wildlife and an ancient synagogue with mysterious inscriptions. 
Shop the Souks. Israel has a number of festive open-air market markets—such as Carmel Market in Tel Aviv, the Jaffa Flea Market and Jerusalem's Old City Market (or souk)—selling beads, sandals, rugs, vintage clothes and plenty of snacks.
Snorkeling in the Red Sea. The coral reefs of Eilat make for some colorful marine life sightseeing, even for beginners.
Winery Tours. Certainly, Israel's wine culture has been around longer than France's or California's, and exploring the newer operations is a fascinating option for foodies wondering what to do in Israel on a day trip. Some of the top wineries these days include Galil Mountain Winery and Na'aman Winery.

Israeli restaurants and wineries set up booths in Hayarkan Park to showcase delicacies in the annual Taste of Tel Aviv festival.

The residence of the late Nobel Prize-winning writer Shmuel Yosef Agnon in Talpiot.

Run by siblings Nimrod Zaltsman and hilla Wenkert, six-month-old olive oil boutique, Olia, stocks regionally sourced products such as olive tapenade infused with Parmesan cheese.

Stop by this a family-owned mill that's been grinding thousands of grains and herbs for more than a century.

At the National Park of Beit Guvrin, Archaeological Seminars runs three-hour “Dig for a Day” programs, where dabbling archaeologists (or participants, as they would prefer) crawl through unexcavated cave systems as well as sift and dig for artifacts dating from the Hellenistic period.

At Israeli artist Ayala Serfaty's 2010-opened shop, you'll find a selection of ottomans and chairs covered in velvet or Lycra and in organic shapes—bubbles; poufs.

Where the celebrated Inbal and Batsheva dance companies are based.

Housed in a former train station, Made in TLV stocks a sleek range of design books, tabletop pieces, candles, and photographs.

Wedged into a tight, triangular site within the city’s central cultural complex, this piece of architectural origami uses a soaring, twisting, 87-foot-tall atrium, called Lightfall, to link a series of refreshingly uncomplicated galleries.