Ireland

Ireland Travel Guide

Description:
If Ireland can be said to have rocked the game out of its cradle and raised it on creamy stout, the brawniest of its brood is Ballybunion, named after the adjacent seaside town in rural County Kerry.

At the long and narrow Cobblestone pub, in Smithfield, in the early evening and then again after dinner, musicians take turns depositing tall pints of Guinness before each member of the band.

Cork's best artisans and purveyors gather here to sell products like soda bread, organic greens and seafood. The 1780's brick structure's interior was devastated by a fire in the 1980's and has since been restored.

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

An ideal pub with traditional music and the feel of Old Ireland.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.

Rory Conner, an artisan cutler, has a studio crammed with rusty blade forms, drill presses, and grinders' wheels, carpeted with metal dust, and looks straight out of the 19th century.

Just 35 miles south of the city, and right in the heart of the beautiful Wicklow Mountains National Park, the hamlet of Glendalough makes a magical day trip from Dublin.

A stand stocked with West Cork cheeses: Ardrahan, Garrigaline, Coolea, Durrus, Gubbeen.

One of the oldest in Dublin, The Stag's Head has stained-glass windows, a massive mahogany bar, and a snug—a small, enclosed space where women in the 18th century could drink and not be seen.

The pub is owned by the flute player of the Chieftains and famous for virtuoso trad sessions. Even without a formal performance in the capacious back room, a pianist, an accordion player, and a fiddler are set up on a stage playing ceili-style dance music for a roomful of eager listeners.

Attending a true Dublin “trad session”—a group jam session featuring instruments like violin, mandolin, banjo, accordion, and uilleann pipes—is a memorable event.