Ireland

Ireland Travel Guide

A standout collection of European masters.

A new-age bar in the Jury Cork hotel with plate glass and sleek iron fireplaces.

Combining the city’s two most famous exports—writers and beer—this long-running tour takes thirsty readers on a two-hour spin through some of Dublin’s storied literary watering holes.

The cheeses are displayed on long wooden tables and kept at a constant temperature of around 50 degrees.

A 1999 brick structure in a village of painted stone, the center has classrooms, a small shop, and a 120-seat concert hall offering performances by some of the region’s tried and true masters. More and more, the rural traditions of Ireland will be sheltered in places like this.

This Victorian gem with its ornate molding and red velvet boxes is a Dublin institution, hosting a rotating schedule of stand-up comedy, big-name rock gigs, and popular theater.

What started almost three centuries ago as a humble weaving shop (in the Wicklow village of the same name) is now a retail empire.

This temple to the city’s renowned stout—a product that’s helped sustain Ireland’s economy for centuries—is the country’s star tourist attraction. The property, originally built in 1908 to house fermentation tanks, bears little resemblance today to the original operation.

Writers from the West Cork Literary Festival soak up local atmosphere at this classic pub.

Europe’s largest enclosed urban park—encompassing more than 1,700 acres—is set just two miles west from the city center.