Ireland Travel Guide

A 1999 brick structure in a village of painted stone, the center has classrooms, a small shop, and a 120-seat concert hall offering performances by some of the region’s tried and true masters. More and more, the rural traditions of Ireland will be sheltered in places like this.

This Victorian gem with its ornate molding and red velvet boxes is a Dublin institution, hosting a rotating schedule of stand-up comedy, big-name rock gigs, and popular theater.

This temple to the city’s renowned stout—a product that’s helped sustain Ireland’s economy for centuries—is the country’s star tourist attraction. The property, originally built in 1908 to house fermentation tanks, bears little resemblance today to the original operation.

What started almost three centuries ago as a humble weaving shop (in the Wicklow village of the same name) is now a retail empire.

Writers from the West Cork Literary Festival soak up local atmosphere at this classic pub.

Europe’s largest enclosed urban park—encompassing more than 1,700 acres—is set just two miles west from the city center.

If Ireland can be said to have rocked the game out of its cradle and raised it on creamy stout, the brawniest of its brood is Ballybunion, named after the adjacent seaside town in rural County Kerry.

At the long and narrow Cobblestone pub, in Smithfield, in the early evening and then again after dinner, musicians take turns depositing tall pints of Guinness before each member of the band.

Cork's best artisans and purveyors gather here to sell products like soda bread, organic greens and seafood. The 1780's brick structure's interior was devastated by a fire in the 1980's and has since been restored.

The Cobblestone is located at the top of Smithfield, near the Four Courts, in the North Inner City. The D7 area has recently become very trendy among the late '20s and early '30s and many mingle with inner city Dubliners in this convivial old bar.

An ideal pub with traditional music and the feel of Old Ireland.

There’s nothing immediately distinctive or compelling about Peter’s…but then, unassuming comfort is essential for a good Dublin pub. What is notable here is the absence of both trinkety tourist-bait décor and flickering televisions—and the presence of real neighborhood locals.