Ireland Travel Guide

The resting place of 14 of the executed leaders of the insurrection of 1916.

Housed in a graceful building that is itself a sort of exhibit (with classically Victorian architecture and a rotunda based on Rome’s Pantheon), this archaeological museum explores Ireland’s ancient Celtic heritage.

The young musicians are quite good, and many of the tunes are authentic County Sligo standbys, by turns hard-driving and lilting.

A beautifully restored hill village that literally sits on layers of Irish history, Cnoc Suain offers a thorough immersion in local culture.

When Paddy and Maureen O’Donoghue opened this bar in 1934, they invited local musicians to perform each night. Considered to be the birthplace of the popular group, The Dubliners, O’Donoghue’s maintains its nightly musical tradition.

A 1960's Brutalist building set amid Trinity College's brilliant historic setting creates stark architectural contrast and delightful dissonance.

Karen Crawford’s boutique originally began life on Smock Alley in Temple Bar before moving to the heart of Dublin’s fashion hub on Drury Street.

A standout collection of European masters.

A new-age bar in the Jury Cork hotel with plate glass and sleek iron fireplaces.

Combining the city’s two most famous exports—writers and beer—this long-running tour takes thirsty readers on a two-hour spin through some of Dublin’s storied literary watering holes.

The cheeses are displayed on long wooden tables and kept at a constant temperature of around 50 degrees.