Indonesia

Things to do in Indonesia

There are things to do in Indonesia whether you are a thrill-seeking adventurer or looking for a peaceful, romantic getaway. From surfing to hiking volcanoes to admiring Komodo dragons, there is something to tempt every outdoor enthusiast. Scuba divers should head to the Raja Ampat archipelago, where hundreds of dive sites showcase all sorts of exciting marine life. Pygmy seahorses, walking sharks, unicorn fish, and manta rays with 10-foot wingspans are all frequently sighted here. Across Indo you can find helicopter tours, white-water river rafting, zip-lining and sunrise hikes—every island has a plethora of adventures just waiting for you to discover them.

Wondering what to do in Indonesia if you’re a honeymooner or just looking to enjoy a peaceful beach vacation? Try the islands of Bali, Lombok or the Gili Islands--all dotted with exclusive resorts and beachfront luxury villas. From these destinations there are plenty of things to do in Indonesia for a serene escape, from golfing to spa treatments to sunset catamaran rides. Check out the list below to find out what to do in Indonesia.

Set right on the grounds of an elephant sanctuary 30 minutes north of Ubud, the Elephant Safari Park Lodge—opened in March 2008—allows guests to get up close and personal with the park's 27 resident Sumatran pachyderms.

A visit here is more than a shopping trip, it is a visual experience. Goldsmiths, both Balinese and international, sell their one-of-a-kind modern designs, which incorporate traditional jewelry-making techniques.

Tanah Lot, Bali's most dramatically situated temple, poised on a rocky headland that becomes an island at high tide.

Dance on this Hindu island is, in itself, a religion and supplication to the gods. Accordingly, Balinese dances are as varied and intricate as the deities they honor and religious tales they tell.

Head to the southernmost point of the to the island’s Bukit Peninsula for the views from one of Bali’s most sacred temples, Pura Luhur Uluwatu, which commands a cliff above the surf.

Designed to resemble a traditional Javanese house, this renowned home furnishings store is located in Kerobokan, about seven miles north of Kuta. Meaning “heritage” in Indonesian, Warisan showcases the handiwork of hundreds of regional craftsmen.

American husband-and-wife team Katherine and Rally Dupps create bold geometric patterns for their cheery line of pillows, table linens, and wall hangings.

Steeped in mystery, this extraordinary 11th-century monument—just northeast of Ubud—is a true don’t-miss. The parking lot is crammed with hawkers, but don’t despair; a set of stone steps leads you down into an Edenic valley of sunlit waterfalls and palm-studded rice terraces.

Where It Is: Set in the Indonesian province of South East Sulawesi, the Wakatobi preserve spreads across hundreds of square miles of thriving coral reefs, which surround an archipelago of four main islands.

The world's largest Buddhist stupa.

Silk dresses in turquoise, crimson, and saffron, plus one-of-a-kind cashmere shawls, are the standouts.

Set deep in the Petanu River valley, Goa Gajah—better known as “The Elephant Cave”— houses an ancient (circa 11th-century) Buddhist and Hindu temple that’s one of Bali’s most bewitching tourist attractions.

Where It Is: Four large islands and hundreds of smaller land masses make up the immense archipelago of Raja Ampat, set in the Pacific waters off the Bird’s Head Peninsula of eastern Indonesia. There are hundreds of dive sites among these islands.

Nightclubs in Bali tend to open and close like wind-beaten shutters, but this all-in-one restaurant/bar/party venue has stayed popular for years, mostly due to its “something for everyone” approach.

A tented safari-style picnic may sound more Out of Africa than Balinese, but an excursion with Esprite Nomade in the hills outside Ubud is one of the most decadent ways to spend an afternoon on the island.