India

India Travel Guide

Also known by “GK,” this neighborhood is divided into GK-I and GK-II. GK-II has us hopping over piles of stuff, as shop-owners strategically spill out on the pavements with their wares.

This market is known for its two distinct sides: its collection of bridal wear on one side of the market,  and the cool, new boutique labels on the other (not to mention the fabulous street art.) What used to be an alternative wedding boutique for up-and-coming designers has also became a h

This market is a straight-up hipster’s paradise—and a treasure trove for any shopper who likes to support up-and-coming designers and niche stores that nicely showcase a strong sense of emerging Indian aesthetic.

The shops and stalls  in this market are overflowing with daily Indian wear, heavier occasion wear, fabric, buttons, borders, studs, slippers and everything in between.

The trio of malls in Vasant Kunj cater to different budgets with an ensemble of independent retail stores, high street labels and luxury shopping. You’ll find major Indian and international labels here—anything from Benetton to Bulgari.

Take a short walk through the temple city's seven concentric perimeter walls, each traditionally inhabited by a separate caste, and come away with a blur of mostly superficial impressions of the "hall of 1,000 pillars" (there are actually 953). Seemingly

Everyone from Bollwood stars Karishma Kapoor to Lara Dutta has picked up pieces at this trendsetter. Creative director Priya Kishore has highly selective taste, but she stocks a wide range of products, including everything from luxury eyewear to summer dresses.

Sophisticated housewares and clothing.

One of India's most celebrated brands offers Rajasthani block-printed linens and clothing in tasteful florals and paisleys at ridiculously low prices.

Best for: Tigers, spotted deer, wild boar, jackals, painted storks (300 bird species overall), plus impressive ruins, forts, and temples

 

A bookshop filled with travel guides, maps, and limited-edition photographic essays.

Unbeatable access to experiences around the globe—learning firsthand about a family-run organic coffee plantation in the Galápagos; dining in a private home in Delhi—are woven into every walking-based excursion, from Ireland to Bhutan.

The tumbeldown manse was built during the 19th century by the trader Raja Rajendra Mullick to accommodate a strange hoard of Chinese urns and ornate statues of naked European ladies and pictures allegedly by Rubens and Murillo, whose paint now flakes and whose canvases sag in their frames.