India

India Travel Guide

Also known by “GK,” this neighborhood is divided into GK-I and GK-II. GK-II has us hopping over piles of stuff, as shop-owners strategically spill out on the pavements with their wares.

This market is known for its two distinct sides: its collection of bridal wear on one side of the market,  and the cool, new boutique labels on the other (not to mention the fabulous street art.) What used to be an alternative wedding boutique for up-and-coming designers has also became a h

This market is a straight-up hipster’s paradise—and a treasure trove for any shopper who likes to support up-and-coming designers and niche stores that nicely showcase a strong sense of emerging Indian aesthetic.

The shops and stalls  in this market are overflowing with daily Indian wear, heavier occasion wear, fabric, buttons, borders, studs, slippers and everything in between.

The trio of malls in Vasant Kunj cater to different budgets with an ensemble of independent retail stores, high street labels and luxury shopping. You’ll find major Indian and international labels here—anything from Benetton to Bulgari.

The former seat of the royal family, built in the 17th century, offers panoramic views of Leh and its surroundings.

Since 1979, the Cambata family have used their deep Indian roots to guide travelers on journeys to the Indian subcontinent. Based in Chicago, Greaves India prepares trekkers to explore bird sanctuaries, spice plantations, and marketplaces, customizing trips based on budgets and wish lists.

The fashionable Khan Market is an upscale setting for Indian designer Ranna Gill’s contemporary women's clothing store. Her designs blend Indian styles and bright colors with a western edge.

Best for: Tigers, leopards, nilgai, hog deer, wild boar

 

This blink-and-you’ll-miss-it nook hidden off the parking lot of the Imperial hotel has a small but worthy selection of jewelry— as well as attentive but not-at-all-pushy service (the shopkeepers outnumber the pieces).

Celiano Godin began selling pianos in Quetta (now part of Pakistan) in 1900 and opened his first Delhi showroom in 1940 near Kashmiri Gate. The shop eventually relocated to Connaught Place, where it’s now a beloved local landmark.

Best for: Storks, cranes, eagles, and hawks, pythons, porcupines, wild boar, nilgai (literally “blue cow”), India’s largest native antelope

 

A Tibetan antiquarian shop.

For a primer on antique Indian ornaments, arrange an appointment with jeweler Vinay Gupta, whose family has been dealing Raj-worthy gems since the 18th century.

One of the world's greatest urban parks, the treetops are aflutter with birds: black drongos, Indian tree pies, mynahs, red-vented bulbuls.