India

India Travel Guide

Also known by “GK,” this neighborhood is divided into GK-I and GK-II. GK-II has us hopping over piles of stuff, as shop-owners strategically spill out on the pavements with their wares.

This market is known for its two distinct sides: its collection of bridal wear on one side of the market,  and the cool, new boutique labels on the other (not to mention the fabulous street art.) What used to be an alternative wedding boutique for up-and-coming designers has also became a h

This market is a straight-up hipster’s paradise—and a treasure trove for any shopper who likes to support up-and-coming designers and niche stores that nicely showcase a strong sense of emerging Indian aesthetic.

The shops and stalls  in this market are overflowing with daily Indian wear, heavier occasion wear, fabric, buttons, borders, studs, slippers and everything in between.

The trio of malls in Vasant Kunj cater to different budgets with an ensemble of independent retail stores, high street labels and luxury shopping. You’ll find major Indian and international labels here—anything from Benetton to Bulgari.

The tumbeldown manse was built during the 19th century by the trader Raja Rajendra Mullick to accommodate a strange hoard of Chinese urns and ornate statues of naked European ladies and pictures allegedly by Rubens and Murillo, whose paint now flakes and whose canvases sag in their frames.

Not so you’d know it to look at the place—like Khan Market, it defines “unassuming”—but this run-down shopping plaza is the insider’s choice for silver, antiques, and jewelry.

Come in for brightly colored shawls made of kashgar, a fine sheer cashmere gauze.

The latest outpost of the contemporary-art giant.

You go through a dusty warren of streets and arrive at the massive ramparts and stone walls. In the 17th century, the citadel was able to stave off the Moghul armies for months. The fort towers over a granite hill and is protected by massive gates with iron spikes to obstruct war elephants.

In an industrial-chic gallery, Pratap is the signature line of designer Rajesh Pratap Singh, who favors elegantly restrained silhouettes and updated traditional embroidery techniques for his attractive collection of Western-style silk, linen, and khadi (handwoven cotton) tops and dresses

U.N.-supported nonprofit that seeks to improve Indian women’s lives by marketing their handloomed products.

In India’s “garden city” (now known as Bengaluru), holistic health center Soukya is spread out over a 30-acre organic farm with orchards and herb gardens, butterfly sanctuaries, walking trails, and a “reflexology track.” Certified doctors and therapists tackle everything from skin problems to chr

Indian-born travel agent Pallavi Shah has more than 20 years of experience organizing customized trips to her home country.