India

Restaurants in India

Indian cuisine varies dramatically from state to state, so travelers here are guaranteed to enjoy a flavorful culinary experience.  In northern regions, you'll find more dishes highlighting meats (mainly lamb and chicken), as well as rich dhal, a wide variety of breads, and both vegetarian and non-vegetarian kebabs.
The cuisine of Punjab and Gujarat is what most foreigners know as "Indian food," with its gravy-based curries, while Hyderabad is home of the spice-packed biriyani rich dish, and the south—including states like Tamil Nadu and Chennai—is where you'll find spicy coconut-infused curries, lentil-based dosa and idili, and the use of fresh fish.
Many of the best restaurants in India are located in five-star hotels, and these eateries often help highlight dishes from different regions—and well as other countries. At 360 at the Oberoi New Delhi, an open kitchen lets you watch your pan-Indian and continental dishes be prepared, while, also in New Delhi, Bukhara features a dish named for a former U.S. President (because he enjoyed it so much). At Karavali at the Taj in Bangalore, rated one of the best of all India restaurants, you'll savor tastes like Coorg fried chicken and Alleppy fish curry.

The popular spot has a modern, global menu, and it's a great place to have lunch after shopping in the nearby Garden Village, which has boutiques from some of India's top designers.

This restaurant chain, with dozens of franchised locations throughout Delhi and other cities, claims to have invented the world-renowned Indian dish, butter chicken. Starting in 1920, the chain’s founder began cooking Mughlai-style dishes and roasting meats in hot clay tandoori ovens.

Convince the chef of Taj Coromandel's restaurant, Southern Spice, to serve a thali surveying the range of Tamil cuisine.

Tuck into a plate of yellow lentils and the river fish called begti at this landmark restaurant in the southern part of town.

Once-stodgy Connaught Place got a helpful shot in the arm with the opening of this chic eatery—the joint project of chef Suvir Saran (from New York’s Devi) and fashion designer Rohit Bal (who did the rococo interiors, a fantasia of candelabra and gilt-edged mirrors, awash in chiaroscuro).

Part of a new generation of Delhi's restaurants, Tabula Rasa serves dishes from every continent: African chicken stew, Australian lamb, Brazilian pork chops, Spanish ham, Chinese pot stickers.

The second choice, after Kewpie’s, for Bengali food.

Yes, it’s touristy—Bill Clinton ate here, for crying out loud—but even local foodies agree this boisterous hotel restaurant serves Delhi’s finest, most succulent kebabs, straight from the open kitchen’s tandoors.

Part of a national chain (but don’t let that dissuade you), this upmarket newcomer specializes in Bengali cooking—arguably the greatest regional Indian cuisine that’s relatively unknown outside of India.