Restaurants in India

While a hokey upstairs cocktail lounge and nightly DJ sets draw crowds to this suburban stalwart, it’s the cuisine that really sings—specifically the raan-e-Punjab, a seasoned whole leg of lamb slow-roasted in the tandoor.

O’Papagaio closed in June 2014.

Mumbai mainstay Indigo’s lengthy wine list is famed. But the drinks are just the tip of this exclusive iceberg.

Part of a new generation of Delhi's restaurants, Tabula Rasa serves dishes from every continent: African chicken stew, Australian lamb, Brazilian pork chops, Spanish ham, Chinese pot stickers.

The second choice, after Kewpie’s, for Bengali food.

The busy restaurant is a shrine to Hyderabad's prized cuisine, biryani.

Yes, it’s touristy—Bill Clinton ate here, for crying out loud—but even local foodies agree this boisterous hotel restaurant serves Delhi’s finest, most succulent kebabs, straight from the open kitchen’s tandoors.

Part of a national chain (but don’t let that dissuade you), this upmarket newcomer specializes in Bengali cooking—arguably the greatest regional Indian cuisine that’s relatively unknown outside of India.

Henry Tham operates under a Zen philosophy: simple décor, authentic food, and great music. The restaurant specializes in modern Chinese cuisine and Asian-inspired cocktails (the national award-winning bartending includes a vodka drink using sugar, basil, and orange juice).

This beach-shack restaurant is perfect for sunset drinks.

Dine on an aromatic mound of saffron-splashed rice laced with chunks of mutton kebab, elaborately decorated with fried onions and cashews, and accented with the lemony twang of dried Persian barberries at this 90-year-old Parsi (Indo-Persian) landmark that is nostalgia incarnate.