Restaurants in Illinois

Long before The Publican served the first sweetbread schnitzel and hay-smoked “ham chop” from a menu that reads like a map of boutique American farms, Chicagoans were in a tizzy of anticipation. Why?

In the land of 20-pound pizza and street-seller hot dogs, there’s a new craving in town, and it comes from (and with) Seoul. Crisp, a Korean fried chicken headliner in the Lakeview ‘hood, dishes out a half dozen versions of chicken, all served two ways: half or whole.

Serving contemporary American cuisine, this River North restaurant and wine bar focuses on seasonal ingredients and wine pairing. Known as The Tavern, the dining room boasts light wood floors, exposed air ducts, and a red, zinc-top oval bar.

After rising to fame in the Ritz-Carlton kitchen, James Beard Award winner Sarah Stegner and her co-chef George Bumbaris opened this New American restaurant in Northbrook, about 30 minutes outside Chicago.

Situated inside Chicago’s Peninsula hotel, Avenues is a feast for the senses, combining flavorful contemporary cuisine with a lush, elegant atmosphere.

Inside an unassuming storefront on Chicago Avenue sits one of the city’s favorite bakeries, Hoosier Mama Pie Company.

With a book like Takashi's Noodles under his belt, it makes sense to assume that chef Takashi Yagihashi knows his way around a noodle, whether its the Asian pan variety or Wisconsin-style mac & cheese.

The hipster BYO nook with four communal tables sits in an Avondale strip mall between a laundromat and a dry cleaner owned by relatives of Korean- American chef Bill Kim. Asian street food?

Aside from the absence of cigarette smoke, it’s hard to imagine that this classic steak-and-seafood place has changed much since it first opened in the same wood-framed house in 1941.

Open until 5 a.m., Goose Island Shrimp House has been a local favorite for late night eats since 1974. Despite the remote location on Division Street and carryout-only setup, patrons continue to return for the Chicago-style (heavily breaded) fried shrimp served by the half-pound or pound.

Translating to “from scratch,” De Cero lives up to its name by offering dishes crafted entirely with homemade ingredients, from fresh crema (cream) to hand-pressed tortillas. The result?

This venue has closed.

"The Sausage Superstore and Encased Meat Emporium" is how Doug's describes itself, so you know it takes the item between the bun most seriously.