Illinois

Restaurants in Illinois

The views of Logan Square’s historic, tree-lined boulevards make the pumpkin seed bagels at this rustic breakfast-lunch-dinner spot taste all the more perfect.

Chef Takashi Yagihashi has a few eateries around town, but the Slurping Turtle is his nod to Japanese comfort food. Featuring bento boxes, binco grill items, and, of course, noodles to slurp, the restaurant attracts a loyal lunch crowd.

For over 60 years, this mom-and-pop shop has served American and Greek eats. Order a George’s hot dog, made Chicago-style with the traditional city garnish: pickle spear, neon-green sweet relish, chopped onion, yellow mustard, sport peppers, tomato, and celery salt.

Wasabi serves a medley of Japanese dishes, including high-quality sushi and izakaya-style small plates. But the unctuous pork broth of the tonkatsu ramen keeps patrons coming back.

Tucked below a psychic shop, Flub A Dub Chub’s is the choice for anyone hankering for dogs, burgers, or hot beefs. Though it’s branded a hot dog emporium, the Roe burger (a burger topped with bacon, avocado, and cheddar) was voted one of the best in the city.

Touted as a traveler’s café, Kopi has that backpacker vibe. Kopi, Indonesian for coffee, welcomes customers to sit on floor cushions and sip coffee drinks and cocktails at low tables. The servers are relaxed and friendly, and vegetarian offerings dominate the menu.

Known for its simple, seasonal Tuscan cuisine, Coco Pazzo features an award-winning all-Italian wine list, as well as homemade bread and fresh pasta—potato and spring nettle gnocchi, pappardelle with braised rabbit, and linguini with chili-flecked Manilla clams.

The smells of Cumin waft into the streets and beckon in passersby to taste Indian mainstays like tikka masala and vindaloo as well as less common Nepalese dishes like goat curry and chewra (flattened rice).

In a warm, polished-wood atmosphere, Owen & Engine prepares British comfort foods like fish and chips, bangers and mash, and a truly amazing burger topped with caramelized onions. Try a cask ale, served traditionally via the English-style beer engine.

A block from DePaul University, The Pig, so-called by locals, offers baked goods, as well as large selection of sandwiches with names like The Catcher in the Rye (corned beef on rye), The Old Man and the Sea (tuna), and The Garden Party (veggie).

Nhu Lan’s bakers welcome patrons with smiles at this small neighborhood favorite, which serves Vietnamese bánh mì sandwiches made with freshly baked bread, plus an assortment of appetizers like shrimp spring rolls, rice crêpes, and veggie papaya salad.

Theater patrons choose Trattoria No. 10 not only for its proximity to the theater district, but also for its fresh, classic Italian cuisine. Try the signature ravioli, made in-house, as an appetizer or an entrée. Present your Goodman Theater ticket stub and receive a complimentary dessert.

The bread and butter alone are worth the trip to this quaint French bistro with Provençal-yellow walls, tin ceiling, and zinc-top bar.