Paris

Things to do in Paris

Over the centuries, millions have fallen for Paris. Whether you’re a romantic, history buff, fashion maven, foodie, or culture hound (or all of the above), you will find plenty of things to do in Paris to fill your days and your nights. The City of Light never fails to deliver, inspiring swooning at Old World corner cafés and patisseries selling the world’s best croissants, underground jazz clubs, impossibly chic boutiques, and exceptional museums that will make your heart flutter. And there’s always the iconic and ever-beautiful Eiffel Tower.
Don’t miss Travel + Leisure’s insider finds from the Marais and Montparnasse to Pigalle and Abbesses. Our listings highlight the very best things to do in Paris—many of which celebrate food. From shopping at a 200-year-old kitchen supply store and taking a course at chef Alain Ducasse’s cooking school to a store dedicated solely to cookbooks and gourmet food purveyors, T+L guides you to the city’s best culinary experiences. Shopping is also one of the French city’s favorite pastimes. Let us show you just what to do in Paris, and where to find top artisans, up-and-coming designers, talented jewelry makers, great haute couture, vintage accessories, and uniquely French souvenirs. Whether on your way to a romantic getaway or a dream trip, T+L’s Paris travel guide—with its 530+ listings—is a must-have travel resource.

At Miller et Bertaux in Le Marais, designers and perfumers Francis Miller and Patrick Bertaux sell quality clothing, perfumes, and objets d'art. The shop’s clothing comes in classic neutral colors like white, brown, and black.

A popular destination for a stroll, this cemetery in northern Paris' Montmartre once served as home to French Revolution-era mass graves.

This flagship boutique on Rue Cambon was founded in 1915 by Coco Chanel, whose brand quickly became one of the most famous haute couture labels in the world.

Not for the culinary faint of heart, this 200-year-old kitchen supply store caters to serious cooks, home chefs, and foodies. Look for the hunter green façade close to Metro Les Halles and prepare for an abundance of copper pots and stainless steel gadgets.

Originally established in the 10th Arrondissement in 2003, this privately funded gallery reopened in 2007 at its current location on Place de la Madeleine.

The twin spires of the Basilique Ste. Clotilde once marked it as the most famous and oft-visited church of 19th-century Paris. Though the construction of Basilique Ste.

Situated on the Right Bank, the Fourth Arrondissement is home to the Renaissance-era Hôtel de Ville (City Hall); the 17th-century Place des Vosges, the city’s oldest public square; and the eastern portion of the Île de la Cité, a natural island on the Seine.