Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

KGB

One lofty dining room, decorated with bright and bold contemporary paintings on every available wall, serves as the annex to chef William Ledeuil’s wildly popular Ze Kitchen Galerie in St. Germain.

Just down from the Louvre on a Saint Honoré side-street, Le Garde Robe is an intimate wine bar and shop.

With their belts cinched depressingly below their stomachs, sagging jacket linings, and gaping pants pockets, the functionaries and low-level businessmen in whom this district seems to specialize are not lovely to look at, but they do know their food, and they recognize value.

Argentine chef Raquel Carena studied with Breton chef Olivier Roellinger, and now she serves Le Baratin’s guests fare like red tuna tartare with black cherries and foie gras with lentils. Near the Pyrenees subway station, this authentic wine bar is owned by Philippe Pinoteau.

A folksy bar des huîtres near the Opera House, with cheesy murals of Mont Saint-Michel and piped-in recordings of seagulls. Sophisticated it is not, and yet you'll rarely find Belons so pristine.

A traditional, yet innovative bistro in the Marais, Le Repaire is renowned for its wine selection and game specialties.

This authentic French bistro dating to 1912 has played host to every Parisian mayor of the past century. Just steps from the city's Hotel de Ville (town hall), Benoit was run by a single family for three generations before being obtained by Alain Ducasse's restaurant group in 2005.

Situated on Rue Saint Maur in Paris, this African restaurant celebrates the cuisine of Cameroon and Senegal. The menu features a number of dishes made with traditional African ingredients such as maffe (peanut) and bitterleaf.

Chef Yves Camdeborde’s Le Comptoir on the Left Bank seats only 20, so reservations for the single-seating prix fixe dinner must usually be made several months in advance. Fortunately, the restaurant also operates as a more casual brasserie during lunchtime.

Tout Paris has been flocking of late to experience the zingy, citrus-inflected cuisine of this 2010-opened restaurant.

The trendy Upper Marais district in Paris is no stranger to strollers and hipsters, but it also houses some of the best and most inexpensive crepes in the world at Breizh Café. The ambiance is warm and lively, with a distinct Japanese flavor in the form of pale wood and low-lighting.

Forget convention: at this brainchild of a World’s Best Sommelier, you first pick your wine and then the chef composes something to fit your selection (taking your allergy to shellfish or aversion to mushrooms into consideration).

Formerly a simple working-class restaurant, Astier is newly elevated thanks to new ownership and a chef who earned his stripes at Le Meurice.

Located in a less-traveled section of Montmarte, this tiny café and bar caters to an almost exclusively local clientele.

A favorite of President Nicolas Sarkozy, this small crêperie is situated on a quiet square in the 15th Arrondissement.