Restaurants in Paris

The food of France’s Breton region shines at Chez Michel.

It takes dedication to find this Vaugirard bistro, but Parisians who persevere are treated to an authentic, intimate dining experience. The naturally lit interior consists of black tables and gray hues, highlighted by plum accents and colorful pieces of art.

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

L’Entredgeu is place few American visitors have know about, but the Parisian bistro is frequented and adored by locals. The name comes from noted chef-owner, Phillipe Tredgeu, who manages the cooking, and his wife, who expertly runs the front of the house.

Surrounded by the fashionable boutiques of Le Marais and situated on the winding rue Vieille du Temple, Au Petit fer à Cheval is the place to go to have a film-like "Parisian moment." Enjoy conversation with the neighborhood's regulars at the horseshoe-shaped, marble bar (this cafe's name means "

Located inside Paris’s esteemed Hôtel Hospes Lancaster, La Table du Lancaster serves as a creative vehicle for chef Michel Troisgros, recipient of a Michelin star.

The Chef: Former musician/pizza maker Guy Martin was credited with resurrecting Le Grand Véfour—one of Paris’s oldest and most storied restaurants—in 2000, when it was the only restaurant to earn three stars from the annual Red Michelin Guide.

Continuing the tradition of the bistronomy that started in the 80's and 90's, husband and wife team Clément Vidalon and Cécile Delarbre bring their classical training to Le Bouchon et l’Assiette, a small bistro in the out-of-the way Batignolles neighborhood of the Seventeenth Arrondissement.

Located in the city's hip Golden Triangle, this gem is hidden away down a cobblestone alley and tucked into the corner of a courtyard (watch for a square, black sign hanging above the alley's entrance on Rue St. Honore).

Located on the Ile St.-Louis, Mon Vieil Ami is run by acclaimed Alsatian chef Antoine Westermann. The small, lively space is decorated with stone walls, elaborate flower arrangements, and dark wood tables, including one long communal table.

Musée Carnavalet explores the history of Paris via this art museum located inside two Marais district mansions. Parisian history starts in prehistoric times (around 4600 B.C.) at this city-run museum and continues to the present day.

Named for its own address at 20 Rue de Bellechasse in the Seventh Arrondissement, Le 20 is a crowded, noisy, Art Deco-style bistro run by the young owners Jean-Phi and Tristan.

For a taste of authentic Moroccan cuisine inside the oldest covered market in Paris, visit Le Traiteur Marocain, a take-away café (with a few eat-in tables) in the Marais’ Le Marché de Enfants Rouges.

The trendy Upper Marais district in Paris is no stranger to strollers and hipsters, but it also houses some of the best and most inexpensive crepes in the world at Breizh Café. The ambiance is warm and lively, with a distinct Japanese flavor in the form of pale wood and low-lighting.

Forget convention: at this brainchild of a World’s Best Sommelier, you first pick your wine and then the chef composes something to fit your selection (taking your allergy to shellfish or aversion to mushrooms into consideration).