Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Presidents from across the globe, including Jacques Chirac, Bill Clinton, and Vladimir Putin, once dined at this traditional bistro in the Seventh Arrondissement, just a five-minute walk from Les Invalides.

A Mexican restaurant in the heart of St.-Germain-des-Prés. It may seem an unlikely cuisine for one of Paris’s quaintest quartiers, but young French people go absolutely crazy over it—the place is always packed.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Facing the 17th-century Théâtre du Palais Royal, this 30-seat bistro is just a short walk from the Eiffel Tower. Beveled mirrors, faux leather banquettes, and crisp white linens evoke the 1930’s.

As avant-garde as its surroundings, Tokyo Eat is located in the Palais de Tokyo, a contemporary art museum dedicated to showcasing cutting-edge talent. Inside the cavernous, industrial-style dining room, colorful UFO-shaped light fixtures flash overhead in time to the background music.

Very well known, chef Pierre Gagnaire serves high-priced, modern cuisine at his flagship 3-Star Michelin restaurant on rue Balzac.

Gordon Ramsay au Trianon restaurant is located within the Trianon Palace, a Waldorf Astoria hotel that overlooks the magnificent Château de Versailles grounds.

Musée Carnavalet explores the history of Paris via this art museum located inside two Marais district mansions. Parisian history starts in prehistoric times (around 4600 B.C.) at this city-run museum and continues to the present day.

Located in the Les Halles area, known as the belly of Paris, the establishment was built in 1880, based on the glass and iron buildings built by Victor Baltard.

Owned by Caroline Rostang, the daughter of French culinary giant Michel Rostang, L’Absinthe is best described as a New York-inspired French bistro. The restaurant nods to New York City with its urban chic design, highlighted by the oversized, antique clock on the ground floor.

Located in the fifth arrondissement not far from Pierre and Marie Curie University, this small wine bar has only three pine tables and several wine barrels that have been converted into dining tables.

Considered the epicenter of the bistronomy movement, La Régalade opened in 1992 under the direction of Yves Camdeborde, champion of the French back-to-basics culinary revolution. Chef Bruno Doucet now carries on the tradition.

Located in the city's hip Golden Triangle, this gem is hidden away down a cobblestone alley and tucked into the corner of a courtyard (watch for a square, black sign hanging above the alley's entrance on Rue St. Honore).

Located on the Ile St.-Louis, Mon Vieil Ami is run by acclaimed Alsatian chef Antoine Westermann. The small, lively space is decorated with stone walls, elaborate flower arrangements, and dark wood tables, including one long communal table.

In the heart of the Golden Triangle, next to Les Champs Elysées, sits the Mini-Palais.