Restaurants in Paris

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain with a minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Rino is the brainchild of Chef Giovanni Passerini, who honed his craft under the renowned Swedish chef Peter Nilsson at La Gazzetta. With seating for 20, Rino offers an intimate dining experience.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Facing the 17th-century Théâtre du Palais Royal, this 30-seat bistro is just a short walk from the Eiffel Tower. Beveled mirrors, faux leather banquettes, and crisp white linens evoke the 1930’s.

As avant-garde as its surroundings, Tokyo Eat is located in the Palais de Tokyo, a contemporary art museum dedicated to showcasing cutting-edge talent. Inside the cavernous, industrial-style dining room, colorful UFO-shaped light fixtures flash overhead in time to the background music.

Very well known, chef Pierre Gagnaire serves high-priced, modern cuisine at his flagship 3-Star Michelin restaurant on rue Balzac.

Near the Jardin du Luxembourg on the Rue Gay-Lussac is a classic-French bistro that also serves as a wine shop and delicatessen.

Hanging bunches of pimentos add a spicy aroma to this small Basque restaurant in the Third Arrondissement. In contrast with its unassuming exterior, the dining room is designed with ocher-hued walls, oil paintings, and objéts d’art from the southwestern region of the country.

Just down from the Louvre on a Saint Honoré side-street, Le Garde Robe is an intimate wine bar and shop.

With their belts cinched depressingly below their stomachs, sagging jacket linings, and gaping pants pockets, the functionaries and low-level businessmen in whom this district seems to specialize are not lovely to look at, but they do know their food, and they recognize value.

Argentine chef Raquel Carena studied with Breton chef Olivier Roellinger, and now she serves Le Baratin’s guests fare like red tuna tartare with black cherries and foie gras with lentils. Near the Pyrenees subway station, this authentic wine bar is owned by Philippe Pinoteau.

Just minutes from the Trocadero in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, Jamin achieved notoriety in the 1980s when chef Joel Robuchon earned his third Michelin star.

Alain Ducasse at the Hôtel Plaza Athénée, owned by chef Alain Ducasse, blends the finest French cuisine and impeccable interior design, providing the perfect atmosphere for romantic Parisian meals.

Few anticipated the Michelin Star this 20-seat restaurant near the Louvre would earn in 2009, just one year after opening. The space's rustic wood beams and stone walls suggest  simpilicty, but chef Adeline Grattard's menu is anything but.

Surrounded by the fashionable boutiques of Le Marais and situated on the winding rue Vieille du Temple, Au Petit fer à Cheval is the place to go to have a film-like "Parisian moment." Enjoy conversation with the neighborhood's regulars at the horseshoe-shaped, marble bar (this cafe's name means "