Paris

Restaurants in Paris

The Senegalese specialties here have earned the restaurant a reputation as the best African fare in town.

The French version of a mid-century American diner, Le Floors serves traditional greasy spoon fare as 1960’s soul and pop music plays in the background. Situated near the Cháteau Rouge Métro station, the café is housed in a three-story former print shop with a bowed glass-and-concrete facade.

At Les Ombres is known for its close-up views of the Eiffel Tower, whose metal architecture the restaurant seems to mimic with its geometric, glass ceiling. Indeed, “Les Ombres” means “the shadows,” referring to those cast by the neighboring tower.

Housed inside Lavinia, one of Europe’s largest wine stores, Le Restaurant Lavinia is the ideal place to sample from the store’s collection of more than 6,000 bottles of wine from countries around the world, including Argentina, Italy, and the U.S.

It is only fitting that Chef Cyril Lignac's swanky bistro in the city's lively Popincourt neighborhood would be housed in a registered historical monument, as quintessential French cuisine and vintage decor go hand in hand. Established by the Chardenoux family in the early 20th century, the names

La Grande Mosquée de Paris, a restaurant and tearoom on the Left Bank, transports diners to North Africa.

The homey Franco-Tunisian lunches served at this elegant North African food-and-crafts shop will leave you with enough cash for a pair of colorful handblown glass votives or a set of handmade stemware.

This restaurant, located about three blocks north of Kerameikou Park, is known for its fresh Greek and Mediterranean cuisine prepared using local and organic ingredients.

21 is one of those under-the-radar Paris restaurants where true gourmands love to dine, regardless of the steep prices.

Café Varenne is more like a convivial brasserie rather than a typical Parisian café.

Rino is the brainchild of Chef Giovanni Passerini, who honed his craft under the renowned Swedish chef Peter Nilsson at La Gazzetta. With seating for 20, Rino offers an intimate dining experience.

This Asian teahouse in the Second Arrondissement is known for its bubble tea, a Taiwanese green or black tea with gummy pearls of tapioca. (Bubble tea is typically sipped from a fat straw so as to make room for the pearls at the bottom of the cup).

Named for the small round iron and enamel pots in which dishes are both cooked and presented, the tiny Les Cocottes specializes in seasonal fare like crab and sucrine lettuce or shoulder of lamb confit with potatoes.

One of the city’s most celebrated restaurants, Spring is owned and operated by Chicago-born, French-trained chef Daniel Rose. In 2010, the already-renowned restaurant reopened in a 17th-century building in the First Arrondissement, just one block from the Louvre.

Popular with Monmartre locals, this cozy, low-lit cafe and bar in the Place du Tertre is known for its good-looking staff and sexy feel.