Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Essentially a hip neighborhood bar in the chic First Arrondissement, La Coupe d’Or is all about people watching from a sidewalk seat on one of the city’s most fashionable street corners. Located on Rue St.

Located down a narrow street in the Latin Quarter, Da Rosa houses a delicatessen and a small eatery. A covered terrace sits in front of the black storefront while inside, blocks of pig legs are lined up.

Wait out a stopover at this spacious lobby bar in the Sheraton, the only direct-access hotel in Charles de Gaulle Airport's Terminal 2. Just a short jaunt away from all terminals via rail concourse, the lounge provides a quiet retreat from airport commotion.

In addition to his mens- and womenswear collections, Black Label, RRL Jeans, Ralph Lauren Home collection, and a jewel-box-like boutique for watches, the new store also houses Lauren's first restaurant outside of the States (the other is in Chicago).

Few anticipated the Michelin Star this 20-seat restaurant near the Louvre would earn in 2009, just one year after opening. The space's rustic wood beams and stone walls suggest  simpilicty, but chef Adeline Grattard's menu is anything but.

Installed between Les Halles and Jardin du Palais Royal, La Cloche des Halles sits under a red awning on rue Coquillière. Tables line the sidewalk, while cozy banquettes and tiny wooden tables fill the interior space.

In a freak flood in 1910, the Seine reached the second floor of 4 Rue de Bercy. Three years later a café opened. In response to the flood, the buildings on either side were jacked up a couple of meters, but not No. 4. Nobody knows why.

Started by Lucien Legrand in 1945, the shop at Legrand Filles & Fils opens into Galerie Vivienne which sits atop the Legrand wine cellars. Legrand Filles & Fils offers a wine bar, gourmet food and chocolate.

Located in Hotel Le Méridien in the outskirts of the city near the convention center, L’Orénoc boasts a contemporary dining room complete with hardwood floors, faux leather seats, and a life-size jaguar statue.

Known for his more highbrow eateries La Tour d'Argent and Hotel de Crillon, Chef Dominique Bouchet embraces simpler and less pricey fare in his self-named bistro located in one of Paris' most beautiful neighborhoods.

On Rue Elzévir in the Marais district, near Rue des Francs-Bourgeois with its boutiques and Renaissance architecture, Valerie Schlumberger created La Compagnie du Sénégal et de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Company of Senegal and West Africa) and Le Petit Dakar, which offers Senegalese and other cuisine.

With its always-surprising mix of art, high-tech gadgets, music, books, and individualistic curios, Colette has quite simply become the bellwether for all things stylish in the capital of style.

For a taste of authentic Moroccan cuisine inside the oldest covered market in Paris, visit Le Traiteur Marocain, a take-away café (with a few eat-in tables) in the Marais’ Le Marché de Enfants Rouges.