Restaurants in Paris

Located in the fifth arrondissement not far from Pierre and Marie Curie University, this small wine bar has only three pine tables and several wine barrels that have been converted into dining tables.

Considered the epicenter of the bistronomy movement, La Régalade opened in 1992 under the direction of Yves Camdeborde, champion of the French back-to-basics culinary revolution. Chef Bruno Doucet now carries on the tradition.

The homey Franco-Tunisian lunches served at this elegant North African food-and-crafts shop will leave you with enough cash for a pair of colorful handblown glass votives or a set of handmade stemware.

This restaurant, located about three blocks north of Kerameikou Park, is known for its fresh Greek and Mediterranean cuisine prepared using local and organic ingredients.

A fun spot to watch the natives drink and scarf down oysters, this neighborhood restaurant and bar in southern Monmartre has local color to spare. Opened the same year the Moulin Rouge and Eiffel Tower debuted (1889), La Mascotte features Art Deco decor and authentic Parisian cuisine.

In 2011, the cuisine of head chef Christopher Hache earned a Michelin star for Les Ambassadeurs.

Tout Paris has been flocking of late to experience the zingy, citrus-inflected cuisine of this 2010-opened restaurant.

This Asian teahouse in the Second Arrondissement is known for its bubble tea, a Taiwanese green or black tea with gummy pearls of tapioca. (Bubble tea is typically sipped from a fat straw so as to make room for the pearls at the bottom of the cup).

Named for the small round iron and enamel pots in which dishes are both cooked and presented, the tiny Les Cocottes specializes in seasonal fare like crab and sucrine lettuce or shoulder of lamb confit with potatoes.

One of the city’s most celebrated restaurants, Spring is owned and operated by Chicago-born, French-trained chef Daniel Rose. In 2010, the already-renowned restaurant reopened in a 17th-century building in the First Arrondissement, just one block from the Louvre.

Located near the historic Garden of Tuileries, Rouge Saint Honoré is a Mediterranean-inspired Paris restaurant serving vegetable- and fruit-centric dishes. The chef utilizes the freshest available produce, including over 600 varieties of tomatoes, to create tempting salads and mains.

Japanese chef Shinichi Sato’s Asian-inspired contemporary French cuisine has been persistently difficult to taste since being awarded a second Michelin star in April 2011.

Installed between Les Halles and Jardin du Palais Royal, La Cloche des Halles sits under a red awning on rue Coquillière. Tables line the sidewalk, while cozy banquettes and tiny wooden tables fill the interior space.

In a freak flood in 1910, the Seine reached the second floor of 4 Rue de Bercy. Three years later a café opened. In response to the flood, the buildings on either side were jacked up a couple of meters, but not No. 4. Nobody knows why.