Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Popular with Monmartre locals, this cozy, low-lit cafe and bar in the Place du Tertre is known for its good-looking staff and sexy feel.

Upon entering the main dining room of Les Élysées, in the four-star Hotel Vernet near the Champs Élysées and Arc de Triomphe, look up to see the stained-glass dome ceiling with gilded edging, designed by Gustave Eiffel.

Across from Norte Dame on the Left Bank, this bistro serves a combination of classic and modern French cuisine imagined by world-renowned chef Guy Savoy.

Chez Savy hasn't changed much, if at all, since its inception in 1923. Located near the famed Champs-Elysées in the Eighth Arrondissement, this quintessential French bistro serves original cuisine from Auvergne among traditional Art Deco touches of Jazz Age Paris.

The Chef: Former musician/pizza maker Guy Martin was credited with resurrecting Le Grand Véfour—one of Paris’s oldest and most storied restaurants—in 2000, when it was the only restaurant to earn three stars from the annual Red Michelin Guide.

Continuing the tradition of the bistronomy that started in the 80's and 90's, husband and wife team Clément Vidalon and Cécile Delarbre bring their classical training to Le Bouchon et l’Assiette, a small bistro in the out-of-the way Batignolles neighborhood of the Seventeenth Arrondissement.

Live out the ultimate farm-to-table fantasy with a meal at chef Alain Passard's Michelin three-starred restaurant.

Just off the Champs-Élysées, Le Chiberta is one of the more affordable restaurants created by world-renowned chef Guy Savoy. Set inside a stylized Haussmann building with undulating balconies, Le Chiberta is a contemporary, multi-room space designed by acclaimed architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte.

Café de Flore, which is situated at the heart of the chic St.-Germain-des-Prés, is a Paris landmark for its storied history, sunny terrasse, classic Art Deco interior, and broad menu offerings.

Just down from the scenic canal Saint-Martin, Le Verre Vole is a combination wine shop and restaurant serving wine by the glass and a selection of small plates.

As a type, the wispy Paris student with holes in his soles is alive and hungry, and you will find him here, tucking into mountain-man portions of chicken, tripe, snails, tuna, and baby squid—all à la basquaise (with onions, tomatoes, and green and red peppers).

Le Chateaubriand was ranked ninth in S. Pellegrino’s 50 Best Restaurants of the World in 2011.

Much like the iconic landmarks nearby, Le Voltaire is a classic Paris bistro that stands the test of time in the chic 7eme arrondisement. Perhaps the restaurant’s riverfront location, emerald green awning, and shiny wood paneling outside gives rise to the high prices.