Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Gilles Choukroun, the mediagenic chef of the new restaurant is the founder and former president of Générations.C—yet another French food movement for change—the boyishly handsome Choukroun is doing his part at the cool gray-and-fuchsia-accented MBC.

Located on a side street just north of the Tuileries Garden and few steps from the John Galliano and Colette fashion boutiques, Le Rubis is one of the neighborhood's top wine bars.

If the adorably modest little bar didn’t tell you you were in a zinc, the conversation would ("L’OM a bien joué hier soir, eh?"). Soccer talk is as central to zinc culture as the crocheted curtains, indestructible Duralex tumblers, and gratinéed pork chops here.

Located in the Renaissance Paris le Parc Trocadero Hotel, Le Relais du Parc restaurant is led by chefs Denis Zanetti and Romain Corbière, who serve French cuisine like cocotte egg with piperade and Serrano ham.

Just minutes from the Trocadero in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, Jamin achieved notoriety in the 1980s when chef Joel Robuchon earned his third Michelin star.

This Alsatian brasserie in the 17th arrondissement has been around since 1925 and continues to specialize in seafood, particularly shellfish.

Known for decades as Lucas Carton, Senderens occupies a site that's been home to Paris restaurants for three of the last four centuries.

Tapas-style dining is the mark of Le Salon d'Hélène, as is the southwest France cuisine created by the salon’s Basque chef-owner Hélène Darroze, who comes from a family of hotel and restaurant owners.

At the original Angelina location near the Louvre, patrons sit elbow-to-elbow in the Belle Époque dining room, with its sweeping archways, chandeliers, gold accents, and dramatic lighting.

This popular eating spot is located in the Marché des Enfants Rouges, a bustling open-air market in the hip, less-touristed neighborhood of Le Marais. The market, the oldest in Paris, has been around since the early 1600's and features cheese-mongers, fresh produce, and vintners.

Parisian foodies are mad for the $47 blackboard menu at Itinéraires. After the smashing success of their original restaurant in the 11th, Sylvain and Sarah Sendra recently upgraded to these grown-up premises in the Latin Quarter.

Given that it sits in prime tourist territory, this small neighborhood bistro is all too easy to miss—or dismiss—but its loyal (and largely French) clientele knows better.

The Senegalese specialties here have earned the restaurant a reputation as the best African fare in town.

The French version of a mid-century American diner, Le Floors serves traditional greasy spoon fare as 1960’s soul and pop music plays in the background. Situated near the Cháteau Rouge Métro station, the café is housed in a three-story former print shop with a bowed glass-and-concrete facade.

At Les Ombres is known for its close-up views of the Eiffel Tower, whose metal architecture the restaurant seems to mimic with its geometric, glass ceiling. Indeed, “Les Ombres” means “the shadows,” referring to those cast by the neighboring tower.