Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

A go-to bistro for the trendy locals of Marais, Café Charlot is housed in a former bakery across from the Marche des Enfants Rouge—literally the “Market of Red Children,” the oldest food market in Paris.

Le Comptoir du Relais has quickly become known as a modern French bistro with no-reservations lunches and hard-to-get reservations dinners.

A modern interior with blond wood and translucent plastic chairs sets the stage for trendy Parisians and tourists who might want a switch from traditional French fare. The family-owned and operated Little Italy Trattoria serves generous portions of fresh pasta and salads in Le Marais.

Fauchon is easily recognizable from its hot pink and black store front. The flagship store on Place de la Madeleine houses a patisserie and boulangerie that sell sandwiches, breads, and desserts; rows of pastries line the gold walls.

Located in a former jazz club, La Société is part of the Costes brothers' empire, a portfolio of upper-echelon Parisian restaurants.

Everything about this sleek room in shades of café au lait suggests a serious restaurant, but the set-meal prices say bistro.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Situated near the Place de la Bourse in the Second Arrondissement, this traditional French restaurant is located in the two-story building that was once home to Le Petit Coin de la Bourse.

Tough to beat for ambiance, this hip and lively Spanish restaurant on the banks of the Seine brings a bit of old Madrid to the city of lights.

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.

Created by the same manager behind the all-but-inaccessible nightclub Le Baron, this hotel’s restaurant, bar, and lush terrace serve as the Paris headquarters for many of the hottest names on the fashion and art scenes.

As avant-garde as its surroundings, Tokyo Eat is located in the Palais de Tokyo, a contemporary art museum dedicated to showcasing cutting-edge talent. Inside the cavernous, industrial-style dining room, colorful UFO-shaped light fixtures flash overhead in time to the background music.

Very well known, chef Pierre Gagnaire serves high-priced, modern cuisine at his flagship 3-Star Michelin restaurant on rue Balzac.

Gordon Ramsay au Trianon restaurant is located within the Trianon Palace, a Waldorf Astoria hotel that overlooks the magnificent Château de Versailles grounds.

Presidents from across the globe, including Jacques Chirac, Bill Clinton, and Vladimir Putin, once dined at this traditional bistro in the Seventh Arrondissement, just a five-minute walk from Les Invalides.