Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

From chef Guy Martin of Paris’s Grand Véfour restaurant comes a new concept of gourmet fast food in a modern setting.

Children can lunch on saucisse et frites (basically a hot dog without a bun and French fries) and ice cream at this outdoor café in the Luxembourg Gardens (enter on the Rue Guynemer side of the garden).

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

L’Entredgeu is place few American visitors have know about, but the Parisian bistro is frequented and adored by locals. The name comes from noted chef-owner, Phillipe Tredgeu, who manages the cooking, and his wife, who expertly runs the front of the house.

Owned by Caroline Rostang, the daughter of French culinary giant Michel Rostang, L’Absinthe is best described as a New York-inspired French bistro. The restaurant nods to New York City with its urban chic design, highlighted by the oversized, antique clock on the ground floor.

Located in the fifth arrondissement not far from Pierre and Marie Curie University, this small wine bar has only three pine tables and several wine barrels that have been converted into dining tables.

Considered the epicenter of the bistronomy movement, La Régalade opened in 1992 under the direction of Yves Camdeborde, champion of the French back-to-basics culinary revolution. Chef Bruno Doucet now carries on the tradition.

Located in the city's hip Golden Triangle, this gem is hidden away down a cobblestone alley and tucked into the corner of a courtyard (watch for a square, black sign hanging above the alley's entrance on Rue St. Honore).

Located on the Ile St.-Louis, Mon Vieil Ami is run by acclaimed Alsatian chef Antoine Westermann. The small, lively space is decorated with stone walls, elaborate flower arrangements, and dark wood tables, including one long communal table.

Musée Carnavalet explores the history of Paris via this art museum located inside two Marais district mansions. Parisian history starts in prehistoric times (around 4600 B.C.) at this city-run museum and continues to the present day.

Located in the Les Halles area, known as the belly of Paris, the establishment was built in 1880, based on the glass and iron buildings built by Victor Baltard.

Chef Yves Camdeborde’s Le Comptoir on the Left Bank seats only 20, so reservations for the single-seating prix fixe dinner must usually be made several months in advance. Fortunately, the restaurant also operates as a more casual brasserie during lunchtime.

Tout Paris has been flocking of late to experience the zingy, citrus-inflected cuisine of this 2010-opened restaurant.

The trendy Upper Marais district in Paris is no stranger to strollers and hipsters, but it also houses some of the best and most inexpensive crepes in the world at Breizh Café. The ambiance is warm and lively, with a distinct Japanese flavor in the form of pale wood and low-lighting.

Forget convention: at this brainchild of a World’s Best Sommelier, you first pick your wine and then the chef composes something to fit your selection (taking your allergy to shellfish or aversion to mushrooms into consideration).