Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

With décor inspired by the Villa Farnesina in Rome, Farnesina restaurant serves gourmet Italian cuisine to the likes of Isabelle Adjani and Inès de la Fressange.

Despite chef-owner Christian Constant’s rise to fame on the local culinary scene, his namesake restaurant remains rooted in the humble neighborhood café tradition.

Food doesn’t come more traditionally Parisian than at this old school Les Halles bistro, commonly referred to as Chez Denise. Hearty portions of rustic French fare served on red-checked tablecloths focus on large, meaty offerings like offal, foie gras, marrow bones, and a steak tartare with a fol

In the heart of the Golden Triangle, next to Les Champs Elysées, sits the Mini-Palais.

Set on the corner of a leafy street across from the Canal St. Martin, La Marine is a classic neighborhood brasserie serving reasonably priced, traditional French fare.

Fresh from Belgium, this natural-food chain specializes in healthy fast food. For gourmands and vegetarians alike, the choices include soups, salads, and sandwiches on organic breads made with ingredients like soft chèvre or smoked salmon ($7).

The new French foodie revolution is the organic wine movement, and restaurant owner Gilles Bénard is one of its great champions.

Located in a less-traveled section of Montmarte, this tiny café and bar caters to an almost exclusively local clientele.

A favorite of President Nicolas Sarkozy, this small crêperie is situated on a quiet square in the 15th Arrondissement.

Not far from the Jardin du Luxembourg, chef Guy Martin established Sensing, and then left it to young chef Fabrizio La Mantia. Sensing was named one of Gayot’s 2011 Hot 10 Paris Restaurants. Royal-purple banquettes and chairs surround natural wood tables.

Epicure in Paris’s Hôtel Le Bristol evolves as the seasons change.

The Scene: Seattle transplants Braden (a chef) and Laura (a baker) worried about making friends after their move to Paris last year. Their ingenious answer: throw dinner parties, and lots of them.

Founded as an organic wine shop that later added a supper club for friends, Le Chapeau Melon ("the bowler hat") in Belleville is now a restaurant that stays true to its oenophile roots and to the refined palate of chef and sommelier Oliver Camus.

The aptly named L'As Du Fallafel ("the Ace of Falafel") is situated in the heart of the historically Jewish Marais neighborhood of Paris, a cobblestone landscape freckled by a dizzying number of falafel stands and kosher butchers.