Paris

Restaurants in Paris

With its always-surprising mix of art, high-tech gadgets, music, books, and individualistic curios, Colette has quite simply become the bellwether for all things stylish in the capital of style.

For a taste of authentic Moroccan cuisine inside the oldest covered market in Paris, visit Le Traiteur Marocain, a take-away café (with a few eat-in tables) in the Marais’ Le Marché de Enfants Rouges.

Whether you're stopping in to buy foie gras from the grocery or settling in for a leisurely brunch or lunch overlooking the idyllic Canal Saint Martin, La Cantine de Quentin is a worthy destination.

Head to the base of Montmartre for a taste of Parisian nightlife. Michou, the legendary man behind this retro-styled drag show, has hosted audiences for more than 50 years. As expected, décor is campy (think dim red lighting, mirror covered walls, and glitter).

Located in Hotel Le Méridien in the outskirts of the city near the convention center, L’Orénoc boasts a contemporary dining room complete with hardwood floors, faux leather seats, and a life-size jaguar statue.

The frayed, yellowed menu posted in the window of Aux Fins Gourmet hints at the long history of this classic French bistro, located in the Seventh Arrondissement.

To call Hotel du Nord a restaurant would not quite be accurate. More often, guests enjoy drinks at the bar followed by a browse through the library upstairs, only then followed by a meal prepared by chef Pascal Brébont.

Near the Place du Trocadéro in the district of the Bastille, Cavestève specializes in small-scale producers and vintage champagnes.

Owned by brothers Gilbert and Jean-Louis Costes of the renowned Hôtel Costes, Le Georges opened in 2000 on the top floor of the Centre Georges Pompidou, home of the Musée National d'Art Moderne (National Museum of Modern Art).

This tearoom occupies the former dining room (and terrace) of the splendid 19th-century Jacquemart-André Museum.

A burgundy front with white trim and a round metal sign bearing the name "L'Ourcine" marks this gourmet bistro on Rue Broca in the Thirteenth Arrondissement. White walls and white napkins with accent stripes contrast with the wood tables and chairs.

The fresh greenmarket flavors at this crowd-pleaser are inspired in part by chef Grégory Marchand’s stint at New York’s Gramercy Tavern.

Just down from the scenic canal Saint-Martin, Le Verre Vole is a combination wine shop and restaurant serving wine by the glass and a selection of small plates.

As a type, the wispy Paris student with holes in his soles is alive and hungry, and you will find him here, tucking into mountain-man portions of chicken, tripe, snails, tuna, and baby squid—all à la basquaise (with onions, tomatoes, and green and red peppers).

Le Chateaubriand was ranked ninth in S. Pellegrino’s 50 Best Restaurants of the World in 2011.