Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Le Chateaubriand was ranked ninth in S. Pellegrino’s 50 Best Restaurants of the World in 2011.

Much like the iconic landmarks nearby, Le Voltaire is a classic Paris bistro that stands the test of time in the chic 7eme arrondisement. Perhaps the restaurant’s riverfront location, emerald green awning, and shiny wood paneling outside gives rise to the high prices.

The fresh greenmarket flavors at this crowd-pleaser are inspired in part by chef Grégory Marchand’s stint at New York’s Gramercy Tavern.

Just down from the scenic canal Saint-Martin, Le Verre Vole is a combination wine shop and restaurant serving wine by the glass and a selection of small plates.

With its Victorian candlesticks, whimsical paintings, chandeliers, and a house-cat that roams the restaurant, Petrelle has an elegant-yet-homey feel.

Designer Philippe Starck restored the 18th century elegance of Maison Baccarat in the Cristal Room Baccarat restaurant, located between Etoile and Trocadéro.

This historic grocer, opened in 1854 on Paris’s Place de la Madeleine, has an outlet with counter seating in the Galerie Parisienne, where you can stop in for (or take out) coffee, baguette sandwiches, and food gifts, such as jam or tins of rich butter cookies.

L’Olympic Café serves African-influenced fare in the energetic Goutte d’Or district, a multiethnic immigrant neighborhood also known as “Little Africa.” Housed in a 1930’s Art Deco building, the café has an upstairs dining area and a downstairs concert hall, both of which are designed with subdue

One of the oldest wine bars in Paris, Taverne Henri IV is located near the Pont Neuf (New Bridge) in the Place Dauphine.

Follow the advice of Julia Child and visit iconic patisserie Rollet Pradier. The stone building, with its large front windows filled with enticements, has been a part of the Seventh Arrondissement since 1859.

Owned by renowned French chef and restauranteur Joël Robuchon, L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon showcases the chef’s award-winning haute French cuisine. The restaurant, which opened in 2003, was designed by Pierre-Yves Rochon and is decked in Robuchon’s signature red and black.

Russian-style teas have been a Paris staple since 1867, but this little boutique and café, located in the sixth arrondissement, brings tea-sipping into the 21st century. Inside, the shop's walls are lined with colorful tins on shelves.

This wine store-cum-restaurant is a new idiom on the Parisian dining scene, and a welcome one.