Restaurants in Paris

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.

The Scene: Seattle transplants Braden (a chef) and Laura (a baker) worried about making friends after their move to Paris last year. Their ingenious answer: throw dinner parties, and lots of them.

Near the Place du Trocadéro in the district of the Bastille, Cavestève specializes in small-scale producers and vintage champagnes.

Owned by brothers Gilbert and Jean-Louis Costes of the renowned Hôtel Costes, Le Georges opened in 2000 on the top floor of the Centre Georges Pompidou, home of the Musée National d'Art Moderne (National Museum of Modern Art).

This tearoom occupies the former dining room (and terrace) of the splendid 19th-century Jacquemart-André Museum.

Gordon Ramsay au Trianon restaurant is located within the Trianon Palace, a Waldorf Astoria hotel that overlooks the magnificent Château de Versailles grounds.

Presidents from across the globe, including Jacques Chirac, Bill Clinton, and Vladimir Putin, once dined at this traditional bistro in the Seventh Arrondissement, just a five-minute walk from Les Invalides.

This unassuming bakery on the cusp of the Luxembourg Gardens offers a range of pastries, breads, and lunch dishes. Its corner placement, with hanging flowers above the adjoining sidewalk, offers a chance to people-watch from either outside or through the large windows.

Le Chateaubriand was ranked ninth in S. Pellegrino’s 50 Best Restaurants of the World in 2011.

A folksy bar des huîtres near the Opera House, with cheesy murals of Mont Saint-Michel and piped-in recordings of seagulls. Sophisticated it is not, and yet you'll rarely find Belons so pristine.

A traditional, yet innovative bistro in the Marais, Le Repaire is renowned for its wine selection and game specialties.

Gilles Choukroun, the mediagenic chef of the new restaurant is the founder and former president of Générations.C—yet another French food movement for change—the boyishly handsome Choukroun is doing his part at the cool gray-and-fuchsia-accented MBC.

Just down from the scenic canal Saint-Martin, Le Verre Vole is a combination wine shop and restaurant serving wine by the glass and a selection of small plates.

As a type, the wispy Paris student with holes in his soles is alive and hungry, and you will find him here, tucking into mountain-man portions of chicken, tripe, snails, tuna, and baby squid—all à la basquaise (with onions, tomatoes, and green and red peppers).

Chez Rene, near the Sorbonne, Pont Marie, and Ile St. Louis, is a popular bistro for the rich and powerful; President Mitterand used to frequently dine with his daughter here. Lyonnais classics are served, with the beef bourguignon and the coq au vin being in particular demand.