Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Café de Flore, which is situated at the heart of the chic St.-Germain-des-Prés, is a Paris landmark for its storied history, sunny terrasse, classic Art Deco interior, and broad menu offerings.

With its always-surprising mix of art, high-tech gadgets, music, books, and individualistic curios, Colette has quite simply become the bellwether for all things stylish in the capital of style.

For a taste of authentic Moroccan cuisine inside the oldest covered market in Paris, visit Le Traiteur Marocain, a take-away café (with a few eat-in tables) in the Marais’ Le Marché de Enfants Rouges.

Whether you're stopping in to buy foie gras from the grocery or settling in for a leisurely brunch or lunch overlooking the idyllic Canal Saint Martin, La Cantine de Quentin is a worthy destination.

Head to the base of Montmartre for a taste of Parisian nightlife. Michou, the legendary man behind this retro-styled drag show, has hosted audiences for more than 50 years. As expected, décor is campy (think dim red lighting, mirror covered walls, and glitter).

Located in Hotel Le Méridien in the outskirts of the city near the convention center, L’Orénoc boasts a contemporary dining room complete with hardwood floors, faux leather seats, and a life-size jaguar statue.

Known for his more highbrow eateries La Tour d'Argent and Hotel de Crillon, Chef Dominique Bouchet embraces simpler and less pricey fare in his self-named bistro located in one of Paris' most beautiful neighborhoods.

On Rue Elzévir in the Marais district, near Rue des Francs-Bourgeois with its boutiques and Renaissance architecture, Valerie Schlumberger created La Compagnie du Sénégal et de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Company of Senegal and West Africa) and Le Petit Dakar, which offers Senegalese and other cuisine.

Near the Place du Trocadéro in the district of the Bastille, Cavestève specializes in small-scale producers and vintage champagnes.

Owned by brothers Gilbert and Jean-Louis Costes of the renowned Hôtel Costes, Le Georges opened in 2000 on the top floor of the Centre Georges Pompidou, home of the Musée National d'Art Moderne (National Museum of Modern Art).

This tearoom occupies the former dining room (and terrace) of the splendid 19th-century Jacquemart-André Museum.

A burgundy front with white trim and a round metal sign bearing the name "L'Ourcine" marks this gourmet bistro on Rue Broca in the Thirteenth Arrondissement. White walls and white napkins with accent stripes contrast with the wood tables and chairs.

The frayed, yellowed menu posted in the window of Aux Fins Gourmet hints at the long history of this classic French bistro, located in the Seventh Arrondissement.

To call Hotel du Nord a restaurant would not quite be accurate. More often, guests enjoy drinks at the bar followed by a browse through the library upstairs, only then followed by a meal prepared by chef Pascal Brébont.

As a type, the wispy Paris student with holes in his soles is alive and hungry, and you will find him here, tucking into mountain-man portions of chicken, tripe, snails, tuna, and baby squid—all à la basquaise (with onions, tomatoes, and green and red peppers).