Paris

Restaurants in Paris

This small Paris restaurant celebrates the flavors of jamón ibérico, a high-quality Spanish ham. This particular charcuterie is cured for up to 42 months, and Bellota-Bellota serves it alongside tapas and in sandwiches.

Situated in Montmarte, this old-fashioned café is best known as the restaurant where Amélie Poulain waits tables in the 2001 film Amélie. While a steady stream of movie fans continues to arrive each day, the café remains a modest neighborhood eatery with a largely local clientele.

Situated beside the Grand Canal in the Gardens of Versailles, this traditional French restaurant is a popular spot for lunch after a tour of the palace. Established in 1895, the brasserie retains its Belle Époque style with white-clothed tables, vintage French posters, and a curved wooden bar.

With décor inspired by the Villa Farnesina in Rome, Farnesina restaurant serves gourmet Italian cuisine to the likes of Isabelle Adjani and Inès de la Fressange.

Despite chef-owner Christian Constant’s rise to fame on the local culinary scene, his namesake restaurant remains rooted in the humble neighborhood café tradition.

Food doesn’t come more traditionally Parisian than at this old school Les Halles bistro, commonly referred to as Chez Denise. Hearty portions of rustic French fare served on red-checked tablecloths focus on large, meaty offerings like offal, foie gras, marrow bones, and a steak tartare with a fol

In the heart of the Golden Triangle, next to Les Champs Elysées, sits the Mini-Palais.

Not far from the Jardin du Luxembourg, chef Guy Martin established Sensing, and then left it to young chef Fabrizio La Mantia. Sensing was named one of Gayot’s 2011 Hot 10 Paris Restaurants. Royal-purple banquettes and chairs surround natural wood tables.

Set on the corner of a leafy street across from the Canal St. Martin, La Marine is a classic neighborhood brasserie serving reasonably priced, traditional French fare.

Fresh from Belgium, this natural-food chain specializes in healthy fast food. For gourmands and vegetarians alike, the choices include soups, salads, and sandwiches on organic breads made with ingredients like soft chèvre or smoked salmon ($7).

The new French foodie revolution is the organic wine movement, and restaurant owner Gilles Bénard is one of its great champions.

Located in a less-traveled section of Montmarte, this tiny café and bar caters to an almost exclusively local clientele.

A favorite of President Nicolas Sarkozy, this small crêperie is situated on a quiet square in the 15th Arrondissement.