Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Not far from the Montparnasse Cemetery in the 14th Arrondissement, Au Vin des Rues is hard to miss with its red exterior and awning.

The "heep-ster" atmosphere at lunch is abso-lutely intolerable (unless you happen to be one, in which case turn on your laptop and start smoking your brains out), but the freestanding, monumental horseshoe of a zinc at Le Pure Café has got to be seen.

Everything about this sleek room in shades of café au lait suggests a serious restaurant, but the set-meal prices say bistro.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Situated near the Place de la Bourse in the Second Arrondissement, this traditional French restaurant is located in the two-story building that was once home to Le Petit Coin de la Bourse.

Tough to beat for ambiance, this hip and lively Spanish restaurant on the banks of the Seine brings a bit of old Madrid to the city of lights.

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.

Created by the same manager behind the all-but-inaccessible nightclub Le Baron, this hotel’s restaurant, bar, and lush terrace serve as the Paris headquarters for many of the hottest names on the fashion and art scenes.

Located in a former jazz club, La Société is part of the Costes brothers' empire, a portfolio of upper-echelon Parisian restaurants.

Chez Rene, near the Sorbonne, Pont Marie, and Ile St. Louis, is a popular bistro for the rich and powerful; President Mitterand used to frequently dine with his daughter here. Lyonnais classics are served, with the beef bourguignon and the coq au vin being in particular demand.

From chef Guy Martin of Paris’s Grand Véfour restaurant comes a new concept of gourmet fast food in a modern setting.

Children can lunch on saucisse et frites (basically a hot dog without a bun and French fries) and ice cream at this outdoor café in the Luxembourg Gardens (enter on the Rue Guynemer side of the garden).

With a central location on Rue Cler, a popular, pedestrian-only market street, Café du Marché is a draw to locals and tourists alike.

L’Entredgeu is place few American visitors have know about, but the Parisian bistro is frequented and adored by locals. The name comes from noted chef-owner, Phillipe Tredgeu, who manages the cooking, and his wife, who expertly runs the front of the house.

Surrounded by the fashionable boutiques of Le Marais and situated on the winding rue Vieille du Temple, Au Petit fer à Cheval is the place to go to have a film-like "Parisian moment." Enjoy conversation with the neighborhood's regulars at the horseshoe-shaped, marble bar (this cafe's name means "