Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Popular with Monmartre locals, this cozy, low-lit cafe and bar in the Place du Tertre is known for its good-looking staff and sexy feel.

Few anticipated the Michelin Star this 20-seat restaurant near the Louvre would earn in 2009, just one year after opening. The space's rustic wood beams and stone walls suggest  simpilicty, but chef Adeline Grattard's menu is anything but.

Installed between Les Halles and Jardin du Palais Royal, La Cloche des Halles sits under a red awning on rue Coquillière. Tables line the sidewalk, while cozy banquettes and tiny wooden tables fill the interior space.

In a freak flood in 1910, the Seine reached the second floor of 4 Rue de Bercy. Three years later a café opened. In response to the flood, the buildings on either side were jacked up a couple of meters, but not No. 4. Nobody knows why.

Started by Lucien Legrand in 1945, the shop at Legrand Filles & Fils opens into Galerie Vivienne which sits atop the Legrand wine cellars. Legrand Filles & Fils offers a wine bar, gourmet food and chocolate.

After making a name for himself at Alain Passard's L'Arpège, chef Pascal Barbot opened L'Astrance in 2000.

Located on a narrow lane off Rue du Dragon, this tiny, egg-centric café is housed in a centuries-old stone building, up a flight of creaky stairs.

Housed in the Bini family home on Rue Gérgoire de Tours, Casa Bini looks like a rustic taverna, with its terra cotta tiles, exposed beams, bright yellows and greens, and two olive trees.

Situated in the Seventh Arrondissement, this small, lively bistro is often lauded as the best in Paris. Run by celebrated chef Stéphane Jego, the restaurant serves authentic Basque fare in a traditional bistro-style setting with closely packed tables and an open kitchen.

It takes dedication to find this Vaugirard bistro, but Parisians who persevere are treated to an authentic, intimate dining experience. The naturally lit interior consists of black tables and gray hues, highlighted by plum accents and colorful pieces of art.

Just off the Champs-Élysées, Le Chiberta is one of the more affordable restaurants created by world-renowned chef Guy Savoy. Set inside a stylized Haussmann building with undulating balconies, Le Chiberta is a contemporary, multi-room space designed by acclaimed architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte.

Café de Flore, which is situated at the heart of the chic St.-Germain-des-Prés, is a Paris landmark for its storied history, sunny terrasse, classic Art Deco interior, and broad menu offerings.