Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

The trendy Upper Marais district in Paris is no stranger to strollers and hipsters, but it also houses some of the best and most inexpensive crepes in the world at Breizh Café. The ambiance is warm and lively, with a distinct Japanese flavor in the form of pale wood and low-lighting.

Fresh from Belgium, this natural-food chain specializes in healthy fast food. For gourmands and vegetarians alike, the choices include soups, salads, and sandwiches on organic breads made with ingredients like soft chèvre or smoked salmon ($7).

The new French foodie revolution is the organic wine movement, and restaurant owner Gilles Bénard is one of its great champions.

Located in a less-traveled section of Montmarte, this tiny café and bar caters to an almost exclusively local clientele.

A favorite of President Nicolas Sarkozy, this small crêperie is situated on a quiet square in the 15th Arrondissement.

Not far from the Jardin du Luxembourg, chef Guy Martin established Sensing, and then left it to young chef Fabrizio La Mantia. Sensing was named one of Gayot’s 2011 Hot 10 Paris Restaurants. Royal-purple banquettes and chairs surround natural wood tables.

Set on the corner of a leafy street across from the Canal St. Martin, La Marine is a classic neighborhood brasserie serving reasonably priced, traditional French fare.

Located in the Renaissance Paris le Parc Trocadero Hotel, Le Relais du Parc restaurant is led by chefs Denis Zanetti and Romain Corbière, who serve French cuisine like cocotte egg with piperade and Serrano ham.

Just minutes from the Trocadero in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, Jamin achieved notoriety in the 1980s when chef Joel Robuchon earned his third Michelin star.

Alain Ducasse at the Hôtel Plaza Athénée, owned by chef Alain Ducasse, blends the finest French cuisine and impeccable interior design, providing the perfect atmosphere for romantic Parisian meals.

Gilles Choukroun, the mediagenic chef of the new restaurant is the founder and former president of Générations.C—yet another French food movement for change—the boyishly handsome Choukroun is doing his part at the cool gray-and-fuchsia-accented MBC.

Located on a side street just north of the Tuileries Garden and few steps from the John Galliano and Colette fashion boutiques, Le Rubis is one of the neighborhood's top wine bars.

If the adorably modest little bar didn’t tell you you were in a zinc, the conversation would ("L’OM a bien joué hier soir, eh?"). Soccer talk is as central to zinc culture as the crocheted curtains, indestructible Duralex tumblers, and gratinéed pork chops here.

Given that it sits in prime tourist territory, this small neighborhood bistro is all too easy to miss—or dismiss—but its loyal (and largely French) clientele knows better.