Paris

Restaurants in Paris

L’Entredgeu is place few American visitors have know about, but the Parisian bistro is frequented and adored by locals. The name comes from noted chef-owner, Phillipe Tredgeu, who manages the cooking, and his wife, who expertly runs the front of the house.

Surrounded by the fashionable boutiques of Le Marais and situated on the winding rue Vieille du Temple, Au Petit fer à Cheval is the place to go to have a film-like "Parisian moment." Enjoy conversation with the neighborhood's regulars at the horseshoe-shaped, marble bar (this cafe's name means "

Located right by Cimetiere du Montparnasse in the 14th arrondissement, Le Duc restaurant has been frequented by the likes of Diane von Furstenberg and the late President Mitterrand, who come to sample the fresh seafood.

Chez Rene, near the Sorbonne, Pont Marie, and Ile St. Louis, is a popular bistro for the rich and powerful; President Mitterand used to frequently dine with his daughter here. Lyonnais classics are served, with the beef bourguignon and the coq au vin being in particular demand.

From chef Guy Martin of Paris’s Grand Véfour restaurant comes a new concept of gourmet fast food in a modern setting.

The slightly grungy, longstanding locale has kept its original, nicotine-stained décor. The long central counter is the best spot in the café to pull up a seat. Drop in any time of the day for a meal, a simple cup of coffee, or—when necessary—something stronger.

With avant-garde interiors by the French graphic designers M/M and contemporary artist Philippe Parreno, this café attempts to channel the spirit of the neighborhood.

In the heart of St Germain des Prés, this café’s generous outdoor patio opens on to the courtyard’s ancient church, and is just opposite the famous Left Bank literary bookshop, La Hune.

This is the Northern Marais’ collective drop-in centre. The expansive terrace is constantly buzzing with trendy locals. Inside, the décor is unflinching and traditionally French, featuring everything from a tobacconist counter to boiled eggs and the daily newspapers on the bar.

This fairly new café, on the Rue de Saint Martin, has a playful, contemporary-diner interior (lacquered wood walls; bold bias-stripe tiles) and a menu of stalwart, old-school items.

Another giant on the French dining scene, Pierre Gagnaire set up his namesake, three Michelin-starred Paris flagship in 1996. He is known for a complex and innovative approach to cooking, and his small, shareable plates can be sampled at restaurants across the globe.

Alain Passard has been running his Michelin-starred restaurant for nearly 30 years, and he continues to name nature as his muse. The visionary chef puts the focus on vegetables, grown in his own biodynamic gardens, with dishes such as vegetable tartare or beetroot sushi.

Before opening his eponymous restaurant, Toutain developed a passion for herbs and for vegetables at six different restaurants across France.

Only 33-years-old, Grébaut transformed from a graphic designer into a critically-acclaimed chef under the tutelage of Alain Passard and Joël Robuchon. After earning a Michelin star for L’Agapé restaurant, Grébaut went on to open three spots of his own, including the famed Septime.

Unlike many of his peers, Inaki Aizpitarte began his career far away from Paris, in the humid kitchens of Tel Aviv.