Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Situated in Montmarte, this old-fashioned café is best known as the restaurant where Amélie Poulain waits tables in the 2001 film Amélie. While a steady stream of movie fans continues to arrive each day, the café remains a modest neighborhood eatery with a largely local clientele.

Situated beside the Grand Canal in the Gardens of Versailles, this traditional French restaurant is a popular spot for lunch after a tour of the palace. Established in 1895, the brasserie retains its Belle Époque style with white-clothed tables, vintage French posters, and a curved wooden bar.

With décor inspired by the Villa Farnesina in Rome, Farnesina restaurant serves gourmet Italian cuisine to the likes of Isabelle Adjani and Inès de la Fressange.

Despite chef-owner Christian Constant’s rise to fame on the local culinary scene, his namesake restaurant remains rooted in the humble neighborhood café tradition.

Food doesn’t come more traditionally Parisian than at this old school Les Halles bistro, commonly referred to as Chez Denise. Hearty portions of rustic French fare served on red-checked tablecloths focus on large, meaty offerings like offal, foie gras, marrow bones, and a steak tartare with a fol

The slightly grungy, longstanding locale has kept its original, nicotine-stained décor. The long central counter is the best spot in the café to pull up a seat. Drop in any time of the day for a meal, a simple cup of coffee, or—when necessary—something stronger.

With avant-garde interiors by the French graphic designers M/M and contemporary artist Philippe Parreno, this café attempts to channel the spirit of the neighborhood.

In the heart of St Germain des Prés, this café’s generous outdoor patio opens on to the courtyard’s ancient church, and is just opposite the famous Left Bank literary bookshop, La Hune.

This is the Northern Marais’ collective drop-in centre. The expansive terrace is constantly buzzing with trendy locals. Inside, the décor is unflinching and traditionally French, featuring everything from a tobacconist counter to boiled eggs and the daily newspapers on the bar.

This fairly new café, on the Rue de Saint Martin, has a playful, contemporary-diner interior (lacquered wood walls; bold bias-stripe tiles) and a menu of stalwart, old-school items.

Another giant on the French dining scene, Pierre Gagnaire set up his namesake, three Michelin-starred Paris flagship in 1996. He is known for a complex and innovative approach to cooking, and his small, shareable plates can be sampled at restaurants across the globe.

Alain Passard has been running his Michelin-starred restaurant for nearly 30 years, and he continues to name nature as his muse. The visionary chef puts the focus on vegetables, grown in his own biodynamic gardens, with dishes such as vegetable tartare or beetroot sushi.

Before opening his eponymous restaurant, Toutain developed a passion for herbs and for vegetables at six different restaurants across France.

Only 33-years-old, Grébaut transformed from a graphic designer into a critically-acclaimed chef under the tutelage of Alain Passard and Joël Robuchon. After earning a Michelin star for L’Agapé restaurant, Grébaut went on to open three spots of his own, including the famed Septime.

Unlike many of his peers, Inaki Aizpitarte began his career far away from Paris, in the humid kitchens of Tel Aviv.