Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

The concise wine list here is a paean to France’s vin naturel gurus, such as the Jura region’s anti-sulfur crusader Pierre Overnoy and Beaujolais renegade Philippe Jambon.

This tiny, traditional, 20-seat bistro-style restaurant in the Sixth Arrondisment, just outside the Hotel les Jardins du Luxembourg, is not just old school, it’s old world.

Owned by renowned French chef and restauranteur Joël Robuchon, L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon showcases the chef’s award-winning haute French cuisine. The restaurant, which opened in 2003, was designed by Pierre-Yves Rochon and is decked in Robuchon’s signature red and black.

Russian-style teas have been a Paris staple since 1867, but this little boutique and café, located in the sixth arrondissement, brings tea-sipping into the 21st century. Inside, the shop's walls are lined with colorful tins on shelves.

This wine store-cum-restaurant is a new idiom on the Parisian dining scene, and a welcome one.

Citrus Etoile is owned and operated by the celebrated Chef Gilles Epie who, in addition to being acclaimed from Japan to Los Angeles, was the youngest chef to ever win a Michelin star at age 22.

A fun spot to watch the natives drink and scarf down oysters, this neighborhood restaurant and bar in southern Monmartre has local color to spare. Opened the same year the Moulin Rouge and Eiffel Tower debuted (1889), La Mascotte features Art Deco decor and authentic Parisian cuisine.

In 2011, the cuisine of head chef Christopher Hache earned a Michelin star for Les Ambassadeurs.

A standing-room-only tavern in the Sixth Arrondissement serving inventive tapas from France (macarons of boudin noir; brochettes of foie gras and piquillo peppers) and beyond (cubes of tuna tataki garnished with alfalfa sprouts), L’Avant Comptoir started as a place for diners to

Here, striped Basque runners on tables and a wine list scrawled on distressed mirrors set the mood for chef Julien Duboué’s playful exuberance: a cheeky boudin noir “napoleon” richly layered with apples; a whole magret (duck breast) baked on a bed of grape leaves atop a clay roof shingle.

The Place du Trocadéro, strategic for its view of the Eiffel Tower, has a multitude of café terraces from which to admire it, but only one is an institution.

Word on the street has it that this cosmopolitan restaurant and nightclub is one of the finest in Paris.