Restaurants in Paris

Located in Hotel Le Méridien in the outskirts of the city near the convention center, L’Orénoc boasts a contemporary dining room complete with hardwood floors, faux leather seats, and a life-size jaguar statue.

Known for his more highbrow eateries La Tour d'Argent and Hotel de Crillon, Chef Dominique Bouchet embraces simpler and less pricey fare in his self-named bistro located in one of Paris' most beautiful neighborhoods.

On Rue Elzévir in the Marais district, near Rue des Francs-Bourgeois with its boutiques and Renaissance architecture, Valerie Schlumberger created La Compagnie du Sénégal et de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Company of Senegal and West Africa) and Le Petit Dakar, which offers Senegalese and other cuisine.

Created by the same manager behind the all-but-inaccessible nightclub Le Baron, this hotel’s restaurant, bar, and lush terrace serve as the Paris headquarters for many of the hottest names on the fashion and art scenes.

Located in a former jazz club, La Société is part of the Costes brothers' empire, a portfolio of upper-echelon Parisian restaurants.

Whether you're stopping in to buy foie gras from the grocery or settling in for a leisurely brunch or lunch overlooking the idyllic Canal Saint Martin, La Cantine de Quentin is a worthy destination.

Head to the base of Montmartre for a taste of Parisian nightlife. Michou, the legendary man behind this retro-styled drag show, has hosted audiences for more than 50 years. As expected, décor is campy (think dim red lighting, mirror covered walls, and glitter).

A burgundy front with white trim and a round metal sign bearing the name "L'Ourcine" marks this gourmet bistro on Rue Broca in the Thirteenth Arrondissement. White walls and white napkins with accent stripes contrast with the wood tables and chairs.

The frayed, yellowed menu posted in the window of Aux Fins Gourmet hints at the long history of this classic French bistro, located in the Seventh Arrondissement.

A Mexican restaurant in the heart of St.-Germain-des-Prés. It may seem an unlikely cuisine for one of Paris’s quaintest quartiers, but young French people go absolutely crazy over it—the place is always packed.

Near the Place du Trocadéro in the district of the Bastille, Cavestève specializes in small-scale producers and vintage champagnes.

Owned by brothers Gilbert and Jean-Louis Costes of the renowned Hôtel Costes, Le Georges opened in 2000 on the top floor of the Centre Georges Pompidou, home of the Musée National d'Art Moderne (National Museum of Modern Art).

This tearoom occupies the former dining room (and terrace) of the splendid 19th-century Jacquemart-André Museum.


One lofty dining room, decorated with bright and bold contemporary paintings on every available wall, serves as the annex to chef William Ledeuil’s wildly popular Ze Kitchen Galerie in St. Germain.