Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

Situated in the Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Museum of Decorative Arts), this two-story restaurant serves simple French fare in a stylish setting.

Clued-in locals and famous food critics swear by this tatty Auvergnate bistro de quartier right off the Place Vendôme.

Located in the Ninth Arrondissement, just a seven-minute walk from the Gare du Nord (North Station), this tiny restaurant and wine bar specializes in authentic cuisine from the Alsace region. Inside, the casual eatery is adorned with decorative tiling, warm wood paneling, and local artwork.

Just blocks from the Louvre, Efisio Mannai's Fellini restaurant presents another grand human achievement: fine Italian cuisine.

Known for its large portions and friendly atmosphere, Josephine Chez Dumonet greets guests with joking waiters that speak a little English, and kitchen staff that will gladly stand for a picture.

The food of France’s Breton region shines at Chez Michel.

The 2009 renovations of Terminal 1 in the Charles de Gaulle airport have introduced the quirky restaurant, La Terrasse de Paris. Designed by Philippe Starck, artificial grass, large flower prints on the wall, and plush red seats give the restaurant a 1970's feel.

There is a subversive element of wit about the temporary Nomiya restaurant—a small glass box installed until July 2010 on the roof of the Palais de Tokyo museum in Paris.

Located on a quiet side street just off the Place des Victoires, this traditional wine bar and bistro is housed in a 17th-century stone building designed by renowned architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart.

Located below I.M. Pei’s iconic glass pyramid, this flagship of the Louvre restaurant complex serves an extensive menu of both traditional and contemporary French cuisine.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain renovated in the minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Just around the corner from Palais Royal and the Louvre, Maceo has been a popular spot for over 30 years for prominent guests such as President Eisenhower. Eighteenth-century walls frame the elegant yet casual restaurant enhanced by large mirrors and deep leather armchairs.

Housed in a historic 1890 building and immediately recognizable by its red facade, Aux Lyonnais is an inviting Parisian eatery dedicated to preserving the culinary traditions of Lyon.

Café Varenne is more like a convivial brasserie rather than a typical Parisian café.

Housed inside Lavinia, one of Europe’s largest wine stores, Le Restaurant Lavinia is the ideal place to sample from the store’s collection of more than 6,000 bottles of wine from countries around the world, including Argentina, Italy, and the U.S.