Paris

Restaurants in Paris

Café Varenne is more like a convivial brasserie rather than a typical Parisian café.

Across from Norte Dame on the Left Bank, this bistro serves a combination of classic and modern French cuisine imagined by world-renowned chef Guy Savoy.

Rino is the brainchild of Chef Giovanni Passerini, who honed his craft under the renowned Swedish chef Peter Nilsson at La Gazzetta. With seating for 20, Rino offers an intimate dining experience.

This Asian teahouse in the Second Arrondissement is known for its bubble tea, a Taiwanese green or black tea with gummy pearls of tapioca. (Bubble tea is typically sipped from a fat straw so as to make room for the pearls at the bottom of the cup).

Named for the small round iron and enamel pots in which dishes are both cooked and presented, the tiny Les Cocottes specializes in seasonal fare like crab and sucrine lettuce or shoulder of lamb confit with potatoes.

One of the city’s most celebrated restaurants, Spring is owned and operated by Chicago-born, French-trained chef Daniel Rose. In 2010, the already-renowned restaurant reopened in a 17th-century building in the First Arrondissement, just one block from the Louvre.

Popular with Monmartre locals, this cozy, low-lit cafe and bar in the Place du Tertre is known for its good-looking staff and sexy feel.

Upon entering the main dining room of Les Élysées, in the four-star Hotel Vernet near the Champs Élysées and Arc de Triomphe, look up to see the stained-glass dome ceiling with gilded edging, designed by Gustave Eiffel.

Installed between Les Halles and Jardin du Palais Royal, La Cloche des Halles sits under a red awning on rue Coquillière. Tables line the sidewalk, while cozy banquettes and tiny wooden tables fill the interior space.

In a freak flood in 1910, the Seine reached the second floor of 4 Rue de Bercy. Three years later a café opened. In response to the flood, the buildings on either side were jacked up a couple of meters, but not No. 4. Nobody knows why.

Started by Lucien Legrand in 1945, the shop at Legrand Filles & Fils opens into Galerie Vivienne which sits atop the Legrand wine cellars. Legrand Filles & Fils offers a wine bar, gourmet food and chocolate.

Few anticipated the Michelin Star this 20-seat restaurant near the Louvre would earn in 2009, just one year after opening. The space's rustic wood beams and stone walls suggest  simpilicty, but chef Adeline Grattard's menu is anything but.

Located on a narrow lane off Rue du Dragon, this tiny, egg-centric café is housed in a centuries-old stone building, up a flight of creaky stairs.