Paris

Restaurants in Paris

This historic grocer, opened in 1854 on Paris’s Place de la Madeleine, has an outlet with counter seating in the Galerie Parisienne, where you can stop in for (or take out) coffee, baguette sandwiches, and food gifts, such as jam or tins of rich butter cookies.

L’Olympic Café serves African-influenced fare in the energetic Goutte d’Or district, a multiethnic immigrant neighborhood also known as “Little Africa.” Housed in a 1930’s Art Deco building, the café has an upstairs dining area and a downstairs concert hall, both of which are designed with subdue

This tiny, traditional, 20-seat bistro-style restaurant in the Sixth Arrondisment, just outside the Hotel les Jardins du Luxembourg, is not just old school, it’s old world.

Owned by renowned French chef and restauranteur Joël Robuchon, L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon showcases the chef’s award-winning haute French cuisine. The restaurant, which opened in 2003, was designed by Pierre-Yves Rochon and is decked in Robuchon’s signature red and black.

Russian-style teas have been a Paris staple since 1867, but this little boutique and café, located in the sixth arrondissement, brings tea-sipping into the 21st century. Inside, the shop's walls are lined with colorful tins on shelves.

This wine store-cum-restaurant is a new idiom on the Parisian dining scene, and a welcome one.

Citrus Etoile is owned and operated by the celebrated Chef Gilles Epie who, in addition to being acclaimed from Japan to Los Angeles, was the youngest chef to ever win a Michelin star at age 22.

The concise wine list here is a paean to France’s vin naturel gurus, such as the Jura region’s anti-sulfur crusader Pierre Overnoy and Beaujolais renegade Philippe Jambon.

In 2011, the cuisine of head chef Christopher Hache earned a Michelin star for Les Ambassadeurs.

A standing-room-only tavern in the Sixth Arrondissement serving inventive tapas from France (macarons of boudin noir; brochettes of foie gras and piquillo peppers) and beyond (cubes of tuna tataki garnished with alfalfa sprouts), L’Avant Comptoir started as a place for diners to

Here, striped Basque runners on tables and a wine list scrawled on distressed mirrors set the mood for chef Julien Duboué’s playful exuberance: a cheeky boudin noir “napoleon” richly layered with apples; a whole magret (duck breast) baked on a bed of grape leaves atop a clay roof shingle.

The Place du Trocadéro, strategic for its view of the Eiffel Tower, has a multitude of café terraces from which to admire it, but only one is an institution.