Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

This popular eating spot is located in the Marché des Enfants Rouges, a bustling open-air market in the hip, less-touristed neighborhood of Le Marais. The market, the oldest in Paris, has been around since the early 1600's and features cheese-mongers, fresh produce, and vintners.

Parisian foodies are mad for the $47 blackboard menu at Itinéraires. After the smashing success of their original restaurant in the 11th, Sylvain and Sarah Sendra recently upgraded to these grown-up premises in the Latin Quarter.

Given that it sits in prime tourist territory, this small neighborhood bistro is all too easy to miss—or dismiss—but its loyal (and largely French) clientele knows better.

This Alsatian brasserie in the 17th arrondissement has been around since 1925 and continues to specialize in seafood, particularly shellfish.

Known for decades as Lucas Carton, Senderens occupies a site that's been home to Paris restaurants for three of the last four centuries.

There is a subversive element of wit about the temporary Nomiya restaurant—a small glass box installed until July 2010 on the roof of the Palais de Tokyo museum in Paris.

Located on a quiet side street just off the Place des Victoires, this traditional wine bar and bistro is housed in a 17th-century stone building designed by renowned architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart.

Located below I.M. Pei’s iconic glass pyramid, this flagship of the Louvre restaurant complex serves an extensive menu of both traditional and contemporary French cuisine.

More affordable than the cutting-edge chef's flagship restaurant, Pierre Gagnaire's Gaya Rive Gauche is a fish house in Saint-Germain renovated in the minimalist style typical of high-end 21st-century eateries.

Just around the corner from Palais Royal and the Louvre, Maceo has been a popular spot for over 30 years for prominent guests such as President Eisenhower. Eighteenth-century walls frame the elegant yet casual restaurant enhanced by large mirrors and deep leather armchairs.

Housed in a historic 1890 building and immediately recognizable by its red facade, Aux Lyonnais is an inviting Parisian eatery dedicated to preserving the culinary traditions of Lyon.

L’Estaminet is a bio (organic) restaurant run by wine vendor d’Arômes & Cépages inside the Le Marché des Enfants-Rouge, Paris’ oldest covered market.

Flowery Art Nouveau wall tiles dialogue quietly with Guimard’s sensational verdigris entrance to the Châtelet Métro station, seen through windows daubed with leaves and clusters of grapes.

Although famed eating establishments abound around Versailles, La Brasserie du Théâtre is a classic spot for French fare and reliable service. The brasserie is situated at the west end of Versailles, near Neptune’s fountain, in a 19th-century building right next to Le Théâtre Montansier.

A note on the door states in three languagues: Good food takes time. We have the food. Do you have the time? At Ferdi, owners Alicia and Jacques Fontanier take good food seriously.