Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

KGB

A bit off the beaten tourist track in the Batignolles area of the Seventeenth Arrondissement, Le Bistral is a rustic chic “gastro-restro” with a twist: The chefwho serves up inventive versions of French classicsis Japanese.

This eco-friendly, two-floor eatery serves an all-organic menuconsider risotto topped with shaved truffles or a terrine of diver scallopsin a design-forward space replete with neon lights and slashes of vivid red and green.

Set in a mid-18th-century garden and a Napoleon III-style hunting lodge in the Bois de Boulogne, Le Pré Catelan strikes a balance between its historic setting and the innovative cuisine of renowned chef Frédéric Anton.

Yen

Located just a few steps from St.-Germain-des-Prés’ iconic Café de Flore, Yen is an authentic Japanese cuisine restaurant and noodle house. The simple lines, wood doors, and lone white flag outside complement Yen’s minimalist Asian décor inside.

Named for its own address at 20 Rue de Bellechasse in the Seventh Arrondissement, Le 20 is a crowded, noisy, Art Deco-style bistro run by the young owners Jean-Phi and Tristan.

Located inside Paris’s esteemed Hôtel Hospes Lancaster, La Table du Lancaster serves as a creative vehicle for chef Michel Troisgros, recipient of a Michelin star.

Located in the fifth arrondissement, known as the Latin Quarter, this wood-beamed bistro boasts a steel counter-topped bar and a wine cellar with 120 varietals.

Situated in the trendy 11th Arrondissement, Bistrot Paul Bert is a classic French eatery with unexpected twists. Inspired by local flea market finds, the eclectic interior includes a bright mosaic floor, oversize mirrors, small wooden tables, and unusual chandeliers.

Owned and operated by Cambodian chef Dao Heng, this tiny, no-frills bistro serves classic French cuisine as well as a small selection of Asian-French fusion dishes.

L’Estaminet is a bio (organic) restaurant run by wine vendor d’Arômes & Cépages inside the Le Marché des Enfants-Rouge, Paris’ oldest covered market.

Flowery Art Nouveau wall tiles dialogue quietly with Guimard’s sensational verdigris entrance to the Châtelet Métro station, seen through windows daubed with leaves and clusters of grapes.