Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

KGB

Word on the street has it that this cosmopolitan restaurant and nightclub is one of the finest in Paris.

Located near the historic Garden of Tuileries, Rouge Saint Honoré is a Mediterranean-inspired Paris restaurant serving vegetable- and fruit-centric dishes. The chef utilizes the freshest available produce, including over 600 varieties of tomatoes, to create tempting salads and mains.

Chef William Ledeuil, who earned his toque under Guy Savoy, is a scholar of Asian flavors, grafting them with impeccably French, impeccably modern techniques, as seen through the open kitchen of this handsome, Michelin star-winning St. Germain restaurant.

Not far from the Montparnasse Cemetery in the 14th Arrondissement, Au Vin des Rues is hard to miss with its red exterior and awning.

The "heep-ster" atmosphere at lunch is abso-lutely intolerable (unless you happen to be one, in which case turn on your laptop and start smoking your brains out), but the freestanding, monumental horseshoe of a zinc at Le Pure Café has got to be seen.

Everything about this sleek room in shades of café au lait suggests a serious restaurant, but the set-meal prices say bistro.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Situated near the Place de la Bourse in the Second Arrondissement, this traditional French restaurant is located in the two-story building that was once home to Le Petit Coin de la Bourse.

Tough to beat for ambiance, this hip and lively Spanish restaurant on the banks of the Seine brings a bit of old Madrid to the city of lights.

Le Cinq, located on the lobby level of Paris’s Four Seasons George V Hotel, offers a seasonal menu of French cuisine prepared using traditional French methods with an element of modernity in the execution.