Restaurants in Paris


Wait out a stopover at this spacious lobby bar in the Sheraton, the only direct-access hotel in Charles de Gaulle Airport's Terminal 2. Just a short jaunt away from all terminals via rail concourse, the lounge provides a quiet retreat from airport commotion.

In addition to his mens- and womenswear collections, Black Label, RRL Jeans, Ralph Lauren Home collection, and a jewel-box-like boutique for watches, the new store also houses Lauren's first restaurant outside of the States (the other is in Chicago).

Situated within the tourist-site triumvirate of the Tuilieries, the Louvre, and the Palais Royal, Cibus offers upscale Italian dining in an atmosphere so warm and homey you'll find it hard to believe you're dining out. The interior space is tiny, seating no more than 16.

A go-to bistro for the trendy locals of Marais, Café Charlot is housed in a former bakery across from the Marche des Enfants Rouge—literally the “Market of Red Children,” the oldest food market in Paris.

Le Comptoir du Relais has quickly become known as a modern French bistro with no-reservations lunches and hard-to-get reservations dinners.

Set on the corner of a leafy street across from the Canal St. Martin, La Marine is a classic neighborhood brasserie serving reasonably priced, traditional French fare.

La Grande Mosquée de Paris, a restaurant and tearoom on the Left Bank, transports diners to North Africa.

Everything about this sleek room in shades of café au lait suggests a serious restaurant, but the set-meal prices say bistro.

Paris's temples of fine dining at reasonable prices are its brasseries, a cross between a café and a restaurant where simple dishes start around $20.

Situated near the Place de la Bourse in the Second Arrondissement, this traditional French restaurant is located in the two-story building that was once home to Le Petit Coin de la Bourse.