Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

KGB

On the north side of Montmartre down a Rue Custine side street, this off-the-beaten-path wine bar and bistro specializes in authentic, family-style French cuisine.

From its roost on the second platform of the Eiffel Tower, Le Jules Verne is helmed by Alain Ducasse (since 2007)—which means the food is truly worthy of its location.

L'Assiette on Rue du Chateau has been a "go-to" restaurant since its opening in 2008, when chef-owner David Rathgeber, a student of master chef Alain Ducasse, began serving classic bistro dishes from his small, open kitchen.

Located beside the old Paris Bourse, Café Moderne serves a reasonably priced menu of both classic and contemporary French cuisine to a largely local clientele, including lunchtime crowds of black-suited bankers.

Since 1946, Au Pied de Cochon has been treating guests to thoughtful French cuisine with a focus on the almighty pig. Decorated in Art Nouveau style, the restaurant boasts elaborate walls adorned with mirrors and paintings of ladies, red leather banquettes, wood accented ceilings, and twinkling c

Presidents from across the globe, including Jacques Chirac, Bill Clinton, and Vladimir Putin, once dined at this traditional bistro in the Seventh Arrondissement, just a five-minute walk from Les Invalides.

A Mexican restaurant in the heart of St.-Germain-des-Prés. It may seem an unlikely cuisine for one of Paris’s quaintest quartiers, but young French people go absolutely crazy over it—the place is always packed.

A popular way to view the City of Lights is at night aboard the Don Juan II, a 1931 yacht where intimate gatherings of no more than 40 dine in leather seats among antique paintings and soft lighting.

Facing the 17th-century Théâtre du Palais Royal, this 30-seat bistro is just a short walk from the Eiffel Tower. Beveled mirrors, faux leather banquettes, and crisp white linens evoke the 1930’s.

As avant-garde as its surroundings, Tokyo Eat is located in the Palais de Tokyo, a contemporary art museum dedicated to showcasing cutting-edge talent. Inside the cavernous, industrial-style dining room, colorful UFO-shaped light fixtures flash overhead in time to the background music.