Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

KGB

Hanging bunches of pimentos add a spicy aroma to this small Basque restaurant in the Third Arrondissement. In contrast with its unassuming exterior, the dining room is designed with ocher-hued walls, oil paintings, and objéts d’art from the southwestern region of the country.

This unassuming bakery on the cusp of the Luxembourg Gardens offers a range of pastries, breads, and lunch dishes. Its corner placement, with hanging flowers above the adjoining sidewalk, offers a chance to people-watch from either outside or through the large windows.

Almost hidden on a cobblestone side street in the Latin Quarter lies Le Coupe-Chou with a facade overgrown with ivy. Since 1962, this non-touristy oasis has served traditional French fare in a medieval setting of stone walls, brick floors, and exposed wood beams.

Owned by actor Gérard Depardieu and his former paramour Carole Bouquet, this brilliantly colored restaurant is known for offering some of the best oyster platters, shellfish, and seafood in the city.

Formerly the restaurant of the Hôtel d'Orsay, this Belle Èpoque dining room is much the same as it was when it first opened in 1900. Located on the first floor of the museum, the restaurant is adorned with crystal chandeliers, a frescoed ceiling, and tall arched windows overlooking the Seine.

Philippe Starck’s redo of this Paris institution, including its Michelin three-starred restaurant, features some surreal touches, from table legs shod in fancy footwear to a frosted mirror (it’s literally refrigerator-cooled).

Near the Jardin du Luxembourg on the Rue Gay-Lussac is a classic-French bistro that also serves as a wine shop and delicatessen.

Located on a side street just north of the Tuileries Garden and few steps from the John Galliano and Colette fashion boutiques, Le Rubis is one of the neighborhood's top wine bars.

If the adorably modest little bar didn’t tell you you were in a zinc, the conversation would ("L’OM a bien joué hier soir, eh?"). Soccer talk is as central to zinc culture as the crocheted curtains, indestructible Duralex tumblers, and gratinéed pork chops here.

Located in the Renaissance Paris le Parc Trocadero Hotel, Le Relais du Parc restaurant is led by chefs Denis Zanetti and Romain Corbière, who serve French cuisine like cocotte egg with piperade and Serrano ham.

Just minutes from the Trocadero in the 16th arrondissement of Paris, Jamin achieved notoriety in the 1980s when chef Joel Robuchon earned his third Michelin star.