Paris

Restaurants in Paris

French cuisine is arguably unparalleled. Choosing one restaurant can be difficult, so we've done the research for you and come up with a few tried-and-true Paris restaurants. Duck cooked to perfection is the signature dish at Chez Janou, a Provençal bistro in Le Marais; there are more than 80 kinds of pastry on the dessert menu, but we recommend ordering the melt-in-your-mouth chocolate mousse. Conveniently located just two blocks from the city's central train station, A La Biche au Bois doesn’t take itself too seriously and dishes up fantastic game such as rabbit and its namesake biche (young female deer). Vegetarians needn't despair; the salads are equally tasty. Astier is a bit harder to find but well worth the effort for its wine cellar and bistro fare. Meanwhile, A La Petite Chaise has perfected everything from the well-crafted menu and artful plating to the traditional décor and impeccably trained staff—after all, it is known as one of the best restaurants in Paris, and the oldest, dating back to 1680. Some restaurants in Paris, such as Le Jip, also serve international cuisine. Order the chicken creole in coconut milk with a mojito, and plan to stay for late-night salsa dancing.

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Just off the Champs-Élysées, Le Chiberta is one of the more affordable restaurants created by world-renowned chef Guy Savoy. Set inside a stylized Haussmann building with undulating balconies, Le Chiberta is a contemporary, multi-room space designed by acclaimed architect Jean-Michel Wilmotte.

Café de Flore, which is situated at the heart of the chic St.-Germain-des-Prés, is a Paris landmark for its storied history, sunny terrasse, classic Art Deco interior, and broad menu offerings.

Chez Savy hasn't changed much, if at all, since its inception in 1923. Located near the famed Champs-Elysées in the Eighth Arrondissement, this quintessential French bistro serves original cuisine from Auvergne among traditional Art Deco touches of Jazz Age Paris.

The Chef: Former musician/pizza maker Guy Martin was credited with resurrecting Le Grand Véfour—one of Paris’s oldest and most storied restaurants—in 2000, when it was the only restaurant to earn three stars from the annual Red Michelin Guide.

Continuing the tradition of the bistronomy that started in the 80's and 90's, husband and wife team Clément Vidalon and Cécile Delarbre bring their classical training to Le Bouchon et l’Assiette, a small bistro in the out-of-the way Batignolles neighborhood of the Seventeenth Arrondissement.

Live out the ultimate farm-to-table fantasy with a meal at chef Alain Passard's Michelin three-starred restaurant.

Known for his more highbrow eateries La Tour d'Argent and Hotel de Crillon, Chef Dominique Bouchet embraces simpler and less pricey fare in his self-named bistro located in one of Paris' most beautiful neighborhoods.

On Rue Elzévir in the Marais district, near Rue des Francs-Bourgeois with its boutiques and Renaissance architecture, Valerie Schlumberger created La Compagnie du Sénégal et de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (Company of Senegal and West Africa) and Le Petit Dakar, which offers Senegalese and other cuisine.

With its always-surprising mix of art, high-tech gadgets, music, books, and individualistic curios, Colette has quite simply become the bellwether for all things stylish in the capital of style.

For a taste of authentic Moroccan cuisine inside the oldest covered market in Paris, visit Le Traiteur Marocain, a take-away café (with a few eat-in tables) in the Marais’ Le Marché de Enfants Rouges.