Paris

Hotels in Paris

Countless Parisian hotels, ranging from five-star international properties to family-owned boutiques, make choosing just one difficult. Your budget and your preferred location will help narrow down your options. On the Right Bank, foodies, for example, may want to consider Les Halles, dubbed by the French 19th-century novelist Emile Zola as "the belly of Paris" for its meat and vegetable markets. One of the best hotels in Paris is here—the Ritz-Carlton, on Place Vendôme. Lavish interiors, perfumed air (yes, really), and the Hemingway Bar (the best among Paris hotels), make for a lovely stay if you've got deep pockets. Exceptional architecture, meanwhile, characterizes Le Marais. Of the more affordable nearby options, we like the ivy-covered Le Fauconnier, just steps from the Seine, with its streamlined rooms and sun-soaked terrace. On the Left Bank, the Latin Quarter is known for its leafy, academic sensibility, while St-Germain-des-Prés was once a bohemian hub for great writers and philosophers such as Albert Camus. Here, the excellent service and colorful painted murals give the Hôtel de Nesle a delightful, cozy vibe.

With its garden courtyard, large fireplace in the lobby, and manor-like appointments, this converted 17th-century abbey feels like a country estate in the middle of the Left Bank.

Set on a quiet street in the ninth arrondissement, Hotel Joyce is a 44-room boutique hotel with modern style. The white walls of each are guest rooms are decorated with faux-finish line drawings of crown modling, headboard and furniture, while bright red pillows and lamps add a punch of color.

This 24-room boutique is a perennial favorite: book far in advance, especially for stays during Fashion Week in October and March. Restaurant scion Thierry Costes and artist and nightlife celeb Mr.

Located in the 11th arrondissement and the Bastille district, the BLC Design Hotel is noted for its interior, which is covered entirely in white except for tiny bursts of color in photographs and flora.

For Paris first-timers, the English-speaking staff at this property goes out of its way to accommodate tourist clientele.

The hotel is set in an 18th-century town house on a quiet side street in the heart of the First Arrondissement.

Renovated in 2007, this 23-room hotel takes its first name from Mathis, the adjacent bordello-chic lounge and restaurant, which is an institution among fashion and showbiz A-listers.

Paris hotels are famous for charging luxury-hotel rates for tiny rooms best described as shabby-genteel. Not so the Sofitel Paris La Defense, with a location in the La Defense business district (a 15-minute metro ride from the Louvre).

Ibis Paris Porte de Clichy Centre is known as a comfortable and convenient hotel mostly for business travelers on a modest budget. Located on the outskirts of Paris, the hotel has 124 non-smoking, air-conditioned rooms and an open-24/7 restaurant and bar.

Just steps from the Champs-Élysées and the Triangle d'Or, this 1889 townhome houses the Hôtel Lancaster Lancaster, opened in 1930 by famous Swiss hotelier Emile Wolf. In 1996 it was remodeled with Louis XV and Louis XVI furniture as well as antique lighting, gilded mirrors, and oil paintings.

The historic Hôtel Regina opened for the 1900 World’s Fair in a building constructed on the royal riding stables of the Louvre Palace.

Le Relais St.-Honoré has an enviable location along Paris’ most famed fashion street and near Le Louvre and Les Tuileries in the 1ère arrondisement.

Formerly Le Don Juan cabaret, the Hôtel Royal Fromentin is located in the Montmartre red light district. The hotel evokes the Paris of the 1930’s with its original period paneling and antique elevator.

Built in 1928, the unapologetically luxe hotel was closed for two years and reopened in October 2010 after a monumental transformation by Philippe Starck, the 61-year-old designer responsible for placing an acoustic guitar in every room, not to mention a private screening room just off the lobby