Paris

Hotels in Paris

Countless Parisian hotels, ranging from five-star international properties to family-owned boutiques, make choosing just one difficult. Your budget and your preferred location will help narrow down your options. On the Right Bank, foodies, for example, may want to consider Les Halles, dubbed by the French 19th-century novelist Emile Zola as "the belly of Paris" for its meat and vegetable markets. One of the best hotels in Paris is here—the Ritz-Carlton, on Place Vendôme. Lavish interiors, perfumed air (yes, really), and the Hemingway Bar (the best among Paris hotels), make for a lovely stay if you've got deep pockets. Exceptional architecture, meanwhile, characterizes Le Marais. Of the more affordable nearby options, we like the ivy-covered Le Fauconnier, just steps from the Seine, with its streamlined rooms and sun-soaked terrace. On the Left Bank, the Latin Quarter is known for its leafy, academic sensibility, while St-Germain-des-Prés was once a bohemian hub for great writers and philosophers such as Albert Camus. Here, the excellent service and colorful painted murals give the Hôtel de Nesle a delightful, cozy vibe.

Small and opulent (when Oscar Wilde died here in 1900, legend has it that his final words were, “I am dying beyond my means”), L’Hôtel sports 20 rooms, each with a different theme—leopard, Italian Baroque, Japanese pagoda—but all tastefully over-the-top.

As its name suggests, the four-star Banke Hotel was once a bank. Located in the Opera district of the ninth arrondissement and a short stroll from the Galeries Lafayette, the heart of this hotel is an extravagant lobby with an arched colonnade, colored in deep reds and gold.

The majestic 1910 hotel—which recently underwent a $30-million renovation—has grand public spaces and stately rooms filled with Louis XVI-style furniture. The 199-room hotel retains all of the grandeur of it's heyday, thanks to the crystal chandeliers, Roman arches, and Italian marble floors.

Hotel Concorde La Fayette caters mostly to business travelers, with its easy access to Porte Maillot, La Défense, and Palais des Congrès.

Founded in 1907 by Englishman Lord Astor, the hotel underwent a British Regency renovation in 1996 (upholstered chairs with tall wooden legs, ornate nonworking fireplaces).

Folded into a stolid 19th-century building on a hectic Haussmann thoroughfare, the 51-room “resort” offers itself up as a hipper-than-thou, early-21st-century alternative to the Parisian palace hotel.

Located in the Latin Quarter near the small cafés and open-air market of busy Rue Mouffetard, the Five Hotel aims to cater to every sense (hence its name). The 24 small but well-planned rooms have clever details such as adjustable colored lighting and a menu of air fragrances.

Located in the Latin Quarter, the Hôtel Saint-Jacques is less than five minutes from several Paris landmarks, including the Sorbonne and Notre Dame Cathedral.

For classic French luxury with a hint of Italian swagger, look no further than the stylish Castille Hotel, steps from the haute-couture houses of Dolce & Gabbana and Hermès.

The five-room Hôtel Particulier Montmartre, on a leafy cobblestoned passageway, is a pint-size hideaway with outsize design. The three-story Directoire façade is pleasingly geometrical—lead urns march up the steps to the front door, which is framed by iron lanterns on brackets.

The Hôtel des Saints-Pères is situated near the Le Bon Marché store and the Café de Flor in the Saint Germain des Prés district of Paris.