Paris

Things to do in Paris

Over the centuries, millions have fallen for Paris. Whether you’re a romantic, history buff, fashion maven, foodie, or culture hound (or all of the above), you will find plenty of things to do in Paris to fill your days and your nights. The City of Light never fails to deliver, inspiring swooning at Old World corner cafés and patisseries selling the world’s best croissants, underground jazz clubs, impossibly chic boutiques, and exceptional museums that will make your heart flutter. And there’s always the iconic and ever-beautiful Eiffel Tower.
Don’t miss Travel + Leisure’s insider finds from the Marais and Montparnasse to Pigalle and Abbesses. Our listings highlight the very best things to do in Paris—many of which celebrate food. From shopping at a 200-year-old kitchen supply store and taking a course at chef Alain Ducasse’s cooking school to a store dedicated solely to cookbooks and gourmet food purveyors, T+L guides you to the city’s best culinary experiences. Shopping is also one of the French city’s favorite pastimes. Let us show you just what to do in Paris, and where to find top artisans, up-and-coming designers, talented jewelry makers, great haute couture, vintage accessories, and uniquely French souvenirs. Whether on your way to a romantic getaway or a dream trip, T+L’s Paris travel guide—with its 530+ listings—is a must-have travel resource.

Located in the heart of the stylish Hotel DeVille district, on the northern bank of the Seine, the Different Company, true to its name, is a different sort of boutique shopping experience. The store is owned and operated by famed French perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena and his daughter, Celine.

Also called the Arrondissement des Gobelins (District of Goblins), this Left Bank neighborhood is home to the Manufacture des Gobelins, which was named the royal tapestry manufacturer in 1662.

Beyond Monet’s multipaneled and expansive Water Lilies ensemble, what makes this recently renovated space truly special is the regrouping of an exceptional collection of modern art.

Located on a street that’s considered prime territory for hunting down kitten heels, stilettos, and wedges, Louboutin’s leopard-print pumps are prey truly worth stalking.

Legendary fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld opened Librarie 7L as a space dedicated to his two other obsessions: books and photography. Lagerfeld conveniently located his boho bouquiniste at the base of his personal studio near Musée D’Orsay in the gallery-laden 7ème arrondisement.

These convenient multimedia computer stations come equipped with high-speed Internet connections, ready-to-use desktop computers, and (in some cases) printers. Rental time begins at $2.80 for 15 minutes.

Before opening his chocolaterie at the end of 2008, Parisian pastry chef and food stylist Jacques Genin only sold direct to Paris’ top restaurants.

Located in the Auteuil neighborhood of the 16th Arrondissement, this open-air flea market takes place twice a week between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.

A sweet diversion for shoppers browsing the stores of Le Marais or those returning from the National Modern Art Musem, Pain de Sucre, run by Didier Mathray and Nathalie Robert, sells a range of artisanal breads and elaborate pastries.

Just a few hundred feet downhill from Sacré Coeur, in the Abbesse quarter, a more authentic kind of charm is still alive.

Situated at the foot of Montmartre, this iron-and-glass Baltard-style structure was a 19th-century marketplace before it was converted into a cultural center in 1986.

The first thing that will draw your attention to Boucherie Becquerel on Rue St. Antoine is the aroma of roasting chicken.

Just around the corner from Avenue Montaigne, this popular source for embroidered fine linens made in France offers its wares at a third of the price of similar Paris retailers.

Bright red awnings stretched across each window of the Plaza Athenee hotel beckon visitors inside to this spa in the eighth arrondissement. The luxe Dior Institut is decorated in a white-on-white motif with grey and mauve accents, arched hallways, and sleek leather chaises.

Designed in the 17th century, Église St.-Sulpice is a “monument to the faith of past centuries.” Under the direction of Father Jean-Loup Lacroix, visitors can attend masses, lauds and vespers, eucharist adoration, confession, and rosary.