Houston

Houston Travel Guide

Slide into a booth for a mescal cocktail or a limited production sipping tequila at this new bar on Houston’s Main Street. Interiors have a contemporary Mexican vibe.

This culture and education center is housed in a striking building by Yoshio Taniguchi. He only used the finest materials—Jura limestone from Germany, American Cherry Wood, Basaltina Italian Stone—when building the $48.4 million structure.

Sloan/Hall far exceeds expectations for what might seem to be, at first glance, another candle and card shop.

Retro-chic DJ lounge. This lounge's eclectic design includes pastel plastic sofas, a refurbished tavern bar from the South Side of Chicago and an enormous Absolut bottle covered with 1,000 coats of paint.

Built in 1958, Mies van der Rohe's glass-and-steel pavilion, a renowned example of the International Style pioneered by the architect, changed the look of American museums—and the ways in which art is exhibited.

In a city whose pleasures and treasures are not always evident, the internationally renowned Menil Collection is perhaps the ultimate hidden jewel, with a main building that's tucked away on a residential cul-de-sac. Opened in 1987, the long, low-slung gray clapboard building was the first U.S.

Established in 1883, when two brothers opened a dry-goods store downtown and began outfitting Houston's emerging upper class of cattlemen and cotton merchants, this enduring family operation has been producing fine bespoke shirts longer than London's Turnbull & Asser.

Found, unexpectedly, in a rambling ivy-covered brick building that houses a homey-looking branch of the Houston Public Library, the Kraftsmen Bakery, and the Black Labrador pub, Cezanne's is the city's most endearing jazz establishment.

More than 20 years of experience have provided Mark Hoyer with the know-how to guide travelers through the most beautiful places in the world.

About 30 miles northwest of Houston, Matt Family Orchard has 40 acres planted with blueberries, blackberries, figs, Asian pears, and persimmons, all of which are available for picking.

Following its 2003 expansion, The Galleria became the fourth largest mall in the nation with 2.4 million square feet of retail space.

Dedicated in 2001, this gray-clapboard Quaker Meeting House is as spectacular as a place of determined simplicity can be. Designed by architect Leslie Elkins, it fits naturally into its modest residential neighborhood; and you might drive right by, not even noticing it.

What exactly is an art car?It's a fair question, more easily answered by showing rather than telling, and that's not the only reason the Art Car Parade, which takes place every year on the second Saturday in May, is a must-see.