Houston

Restaurants in Houston

The Houston restaurants scene may surprise you. Yes, there are barbeque and Tex-Mex options, as well as Cajun ones (the city is less than 300 miles from Louisiana), but also a number of excellent Vietnamese options given the city's large immigrant population, and representatives of just about any other global cuisine you might want.
If you haven't heard, Texas is known for its barbeque. Among the restaurants in Houston that stand out for getting it exactly right is Goode Company Texas Bar-B-Q. There are now seven Goode Company locations in Houston, but the one on Kirby Drive is the original, having opened in 1977. Head to this barn/warehouse filled with Texas memorabilia to savor the mesquite flavors of the meats and the signature jalapeño cheese bread.
There is big money in this town, and a number of restaurants in Houston cater to expensive tastes. De Marco would make most lists of the best restaurants in Houston, definitely any list of the best Italian restaurants. Located in an unassuming house in the Montrose neighborhood, the kitchen gives roasted Texas quail and Colorado lamb chops the Italian treatment, which satisfies their loyal guests.

Texas is known for its barbecue, and as locals will tell you, Goode Company Texas Bar-B-Q is the place to go in Houston for authentic Texas barbecue.

The more casual sibling of Churrascos, which has locations in Westchase and River Oaks, Amazón Grill still brings the flavorful, creative Latin cuisine restaurateur Michael Cordúa is known for.

This venue has closed.

This little bit of Paris, charmingly set in an unassuming brick house at the edge of the Museum District, is the labor of love of two young Frenchmen, Eric LeGros and Dominique Bocquier. When it opened in late 2007, they brought a homey touch to serious French cooking.

Once a neighborhood icehouse, the renovated building on the corner of Sawyer and Decatur Streets now houses Beaver’s restaurant and bar.

An overnight success when it opened in 2006, Dolce Vita, which occupies a rambling two-story Victorian house, feels like a private—but very welcoming—club for the young and hip Montrose denizens who swarm here every evening, spilling out onto the restaurant's jasmine-covered patio.

This venue is now closed.

First established in Guatemala in 1971, this family-owned eatery is now an international franchise offering authentic, affordable Latin fare.

17

Though located some 40 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico, by 1920 Houston was a booming port, known as the city where 17 railroads meet the sea—hence the name of this restaurant, situated just off the lobby of the Alden Hotel.

One of the most nourishing and idiosyncratic spots to open in town since, well, ever, is Feast, set in a rambling Arts and Crafts house in Montrose.

This Montrose eatery is a neighborhood favorite for those looking to relax with a cup of coffee or light sandwich. Besides the exposed brick interior, Brasil features two outdoor spaces: a shady patio facing Dunlavy and a courtyard in the back.