Houston

Restaurants in Houston

A farm-to-table restaurant in every sense of the phrase, chef Monica Pope's t'afia offers a refreshingly approachable take on New American cuisine.

With its mix of gold-colored and limestone walls, cherry wood floors and soft lighting, Arturo's dining room transports you to Tuscany.

The more casual sibling of Churrascos, which has locations in Westchase and River Oaks, Amazón Grill still brings the flavorful, creative Latin cuisine restaurateur Michael Cordúa is known for.

This venue has closed.

This venue has closed.

Housed in a 1925 structure built by well-known Houston architect Joseph Finger, Hugo's brings regional Mexican cuisine to the Montrose area. As a Mexican native, executive chef Hugo Ortega has an expert understanding of the country’s earthy, complex flavors.

Terminal C in George Bush Intercontinental Airport may be the last place travelers expect to find a French brasserie, but Le Grand Comptoir is just that. The decor utilizes dark-wood finishes, rock arches, and red and green tones.

This little bit of Paris, charmingly set in an unassuming brick house at the edge of the Museum District, is the labor of love of two young Frenchmen, Eric LeGros and Dominique Bocquier. When it opened in late 2007, they brought a homey touch to serious French cooking.

Once a neighborhood icehouse, the renovated building on the corner of Sawyer and Decatur Streets now houses Beaver’s restaurant and bar.

Thanks to a tagline that promises Churrascos is "further south than you have ever been before," patrons expect to find the best Latin American American food in Houston at Michael Cordúa's upscale restaurant, and it certainly delivers.

This venue has closed.

Often lauded as the best Italian restaurant in Houston, Da Marco is set in an unassuming Montrose cottage that belies an elegant interior of hardwood floors, white tablecloths, and pale yellow walls.