Restaurants in Houston

Over the years, this rambling old Arts and Crafts bungalow with sunny rooms and a deep front deck that overlooks the street has housed a string of uninspired restaurants. But Brasserie Max and Julie, opened in late 2007, seems destined for success.

As you pass through a wall of water, divided by double glass doors, you realize you’re in for a special meal at Tony's. Inside the dining room, the soaring ceiling is topped with a row of skylights and the brightly colored walls are covered with fine art.

Located in The Heights, Shade showcases a cross-cultural menu from executive chef David Luna, offering everything from Asian-inspired entrées to Southern brunch classics.

Named after an island off Spain, Ibiza delights Houston's Montrose residents with a fusion of Spanish, Mediterranean, and French cuisine from the open kitchen of chef Charles Clark.

Located in the Heights neighborhood, the Glass Wall offers seasonal menus of modern American cuisine created by chef Jorge Rodriguez.

This venue has closed.

This venue has closed.

Said to be one of the only authentic Sardinian restaurants in the country, Houston’s Arcodoro seeks to transport diners to this beautiful island off the Italian coast.

One of Houston’s most famous steakhouses, the Strip House occupies a prime downtown location within walking distance of the George R. Brown Convention Center.

About 30 minutes south of Houston, this renowned steakhouse is tucked away inside a deceptively understated former icehouse. The dining room, however, is decidedly upscale, with classic white tablecloths, decorative ironwork, and Old West—themed paintings.

A line of patrons wrapping around the entirety of this bright yellow building is a common sight in Midtown, especially on weekends. Serving breakfast until 2 p.m., the restaurant is known for its signature wings and waffles as well as "katfish" and grits.