Houston

Restaurants in Houston

Just a few blocks east of Montrose, Indika blends traditional Indian ingredients with fresh, local ingredients to create a progressive take on Indian cuisine.

Eating at the old-style family diner in Houston feels like an Edward Hopper dream with a Deep South spirit on the side. The same soulful bunch of ladies in the back kitchen have been at the Inn for ages, and five days a week they fry yardbirds to order.

17

Though located some 40 miles inland from the Gulf of Mexico, by 1920 Houston was a booming port, known as the city where 17 railroads meet the sea—hence the name of this restaurant, situated just off the lobby of the Alden Hotel.

One of the most nourishing and idiosyncratic spots to open in town since, well, ever, is Feast, set in a rambling Arts and Crafts house in Montrose.

The Westchase location of Michael Cordúa's upscale Latin American franchise offers a cozier setting than its more contemporary River Oaks sibling, with simple, white linen-covered tables keenly arranged in front of multiple fireplaces.

Ideal for pre-show dining, Artista offers contemporary American cuisine inside the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts.

Established in 1967 as a sister restaurant to Commander’s Palace in New Orleans, this Midtown landmark is renowned for its award-winning Southern and Creole cuisine. Designed by architect John F. Staub, the restaurant burned to the ground during Hurricane Ike but was completely restored in 2010.

This Montrose eatery is a neighborhood favorite for those looking to relax with a cup of coffee or light sandwich. Besides the exposed brick interior, Brasil features two outdoor spaces: a shady patio facing Dunlavy and a courtyard in the back.

This venue has closed.

It’s hard not to feel like a kid inside this River Oaks candy store. Shades of purple fill the shop, which, as the name suggests, sells everything chocolate, including chocolate-covered popcorn, candy bars, cookies, chocolate-dipped fruits and even chocolate pizza.

Over the years, this rambling old Arts and Crafts bungalow with sunny rooms and a deep front deck that overlooks the street has housed a string of uninspired restaurants. But Brasserie Max and Julie, opened in late 2007, seems destined for success.

As you pass through a wall of water, divided by double glass doors, you realize you’re in for a special meal at Tony's. Inside the dining room, the soaring ceiling is topped with a row of skylights and the brightly colored walls are covered with fine art.