Houston

Restaurants in Houston

The Houston restaurants scene may surprise you. Yes, there are barbeque and Tex-Mex options, as well as Cajun ones (the city is less than 300 miles from Louisiana), but also a number of excellent Vietnamese options given the city's large immigrant population, and representatives of just about any other global cuisine you might want.
If you haven't heard, Texas is known for its barbeque. Among the restaurants in Houston that stand out for getting it exactly right is Goode Company Texas Bar-B-Q. There are now seven Goode Company locations in Houston, but the one on Kirby Drive is the original, having opened in 1977. Head to this barn/warehouse filled with Texas memorabilia to savor the mesquite flavors of the meats and the signature jalapeño cheese bread.
There is big money in this town, and a number of restaurants in Houston cater to expensive tastes. De Marco would make most lists of the best restaurants in Houston, definitely any list of the best Italian restaurants. Located in an unassuming house in the Montrose neighborhood, the kitchen gives roasted Texas quail and Colorado lamb chops the Italian treatment, which satisfies their loyal guests.

With its mix of gold-colored and limestone walls, cherry wood floors and soft lighting, Arturo's dining room transports you to Tuscany.

A farm-to-table restaurant in every sense of the phrase, chef Monica Pope's t'afia offers a refreshingly approachable take on New American cuisine.

The more casual sibling of Churrascos, which has locations in Westchase and River Oaks, Amazón Grill still brings the flavorful, creative Latin cuisine restaurateur Michael Cordúa is known for.

This venue has closed.

This venue has closed.

Housed in a 1925 structure built by well-known Houston architect Joseph Finger, Hugo's brings regional Mexican cuisine to the Montrose area. As a Mexican native, executive chef Hugo Ortega has an expert understanding of the country’s earthy, complex flavors.

Terminal C in George Bush Intercontinental Airport may be the last place travelers expect to find a French brasserie, but Le Grand Comptoir is just that. The decor utilizes dark-wood finishes, rock arches, and red and green tones.

Once a neighborhood icehouse, the renovated building on the corner of Sawyer and Decatur Streets now houses Beaver’s restaurant and bar.

This little bit of Paris, charmingly set in an unassuming brick house at the edge of the Museum District, is the labor of love of two young Frenchmen, Eric LeGros and Dominique Bocquier. When it opened in late 2007, they brought a homey touch to serious French cooking.

Thanks to a tagline that promises Churrascos is "further south than you have ever been before," patrons expect to find the best Latin American American food in Houston at Michael Cordúa's upscale restaurant, and it certainly delivers.

This venue has closed.

Often lauded as the best Italian restaurant in Houston, Da Marco is set in an unassuming Montrose cottage that belies an elegant interior of hardwood floors, white tablecloths, and pale yellow walls.