Houston

Things to do in Houston

Houston's museums cover the gamut from space travel to modern art, while Hermann Park and the Galleria provide less cerebral distractions.

Johnson Space Center. Exhibits cover the history of NASA expeditions and visitors can touch a moon rock.
Museum of Fine Arts Houston. At over 300,000 square feet, Houston's Museum of Fine Arts is one of the largest art museums in the country. Among its seven buildings is the only Mies van der Rohe designed museum in the United States.
Menil Collection. Architect Renzo Piano's first American commission was the building to house the collection of John and Dominique de Menil. Especially notable for its early modernist art it also includes works ranging from South Pacific carvings to Byzantine frescoes.
Hermann Park. Near Rice University and the Museum District, this park is one of Houston's most popular and is also home to the Houston Zoo, a Japanese Garden, and the Museum of Natural Science.
The Galleria. At 3 million square feet, with 375 stores, a hotel, and an ice-skating rink, the Galleria is a destination in its own right. It's also the largest mall in Texas and the 8th largest in the country.

Success has not spoiled Chloe Dao, winner of Project Runway's second season. Located on the edge of Rice Village, the almost bare-bones space is nothing fancy, and the no-nonsense, no-frills aspect of the enterprise is refreshing. Here, it's all about the clothes.

Worship film? This micro-cinema, housed in a little white 1924 church, gives literal meaning to the phrase and passion. Congregations of moviegoers sit in pews in an intimate environment that's part theater, part art space.

Retro-chic DJ lounge. This lounge's eclectic design includes pastel plastic sofas, a refurbished tavern bar from the South Side of Chicago and an enormous Absolut bottle covered with 1,000 coats of paint.

Sloan/Hall far exceeds expectations for what might seem to be, at first glance, another candle and card shop.

Established in 1883, when two brothers opened a dry-goods store downtown and began outfitting Houston's emerging upper class of cattlemen and cotton merchants, this enduring family operation has been producing fine bespoke shirts longer than London's Turnbull & Asser.

Dedicated in 2001, this gray-clapboard Quaker Meeting House is as spectacular as a place of determined simplicity can be. Designed by architect Leslie Elkins, it fits naturally into its modest residential neighborhood; and you might drive right by, not even noticing it.

With its location near the Rice University campus, you might expect Under the Volcano to be a dive-y, rowdy college bar, but it serves some of the best cocktails around. Fresh ingredients are used to make drinks like the strawberry basil margarita, bloody Mary and frozen screwdrivers.

Evolving from the city's thriving hip-hop music scene, The Tipping Point is something more than a store for the sneaker connoisseur. The three owners, in fact, prefer to call it a gallery and a mission, with the stated aim of making Houston a more creative, international city.

Crystal chandeliers hang from ceiling grids of hog panel (heavy metal agricultural fencing); statuesque 19th-century gilded candlesticks are clustered together atop an industrial dryer drum; an 18th-century Italian settee sports thoroughly modern canvas drop-cloth upholstery; and it's all dramati

Rearing up at the main gateway, an equestrian statue of Sam Houston keeps watch over the 445 acres of Hermann Park, which is nearing completion of a major renovation.

As a nod to Houston’s long history with the railroad, the Houston Astros new MLB stadium was built on the site occupied by the city’s historic Union Station. Outside Minute Maid Park's left-field wall sits a full-size vintage locomotive running along 800 feet of track.

There's nothing to do in this converted icehouse but enjoy a cold one, strike up conversations with the friendly bartenders and fellow customers, and watch the world zoom by. And that's just the point. Icehouses were once common along southern U.S.

Willie Wonka has apparently found a new home in Houston at this eye-popping, all-American candy store. Everywhere you look in this chockablock room, there are towering, overflowing displays of the candy you knew as a kid.