Houston

Things to do in Houston

Houston's museums cover the gamut from space travel to modern art, while Hermann Park and the Galleria provide less cerebral distractions.

Johnson Space Center. Exhibits cover the history of NASA expeditions and visitors can touch a moon rock.
Museum of Fine Arts Houston. At over 300,000 square feet, Houston's Museum of Fine Arts is one of the largest art museums in the country. Among its seven buildings is the only Mies van der Rohe designed museum in the United States.
Menil Collection. Architect Renzo Piano's first American commission was the building to house the collection of John and Dominique de Menil. Especially notable for its early modernist art it also includes works ranging from South Pacific carvings to Byzantine frescoes.
Hermann Park. Near Rice University and the Museum District, this park is one of Houston's most popular and is also home to the Houston Zoo, a Japanese Garden, and the Museum of Natural Science.
The Galleria. At 3 million square feet, with 375 stores, a hotel, and an ice-skating rink, the Galleria is a destination in its own right. It's also the largest mall in Texas and the 8th largest in the country.

Dedicated in 2001, this gray-clapboard Quaker Meeting House is as spectacular as a place of determined simplicity can be. Designed by architect Leslie Elkins, it fits naturally into its modest residential neighborhood; and you might drive right by, not even noticing it.

Evolving from the city's thriving hip-hop music scene, The Tipping Point is something more than a store for the sneaker connoisseur. The three owners, in fact, prefer to call it a gallery and a mission, with the stated aim of making Houston a more creative, international city.

With its location near the Rice University campus, you might expect Under the Volcano to be a dive-y, rowdy college bar, but it serves some of the best cocktails around. Fresh ingredients are used to make drinks like the strawberry basil margarita, bloody Mary and frozen screwdrivers.

Crystal chandeliers hang from ceiling grids of hog panel (heavy metal agricultural fencing); statuesque 19th-century gilded candlesticks are clustered together atop an industrial dryer drum; an 18th-century Italian settee sports thoroughly modern canvas drop-cloth upholstery; and it's all dramati

Rearing up at the main gateway, an equestrian statue of Sam Houston keeps watch over the 445 acres of Hermann Park, which is nearing completion of a major renovation.

There's nothing to do in this converted icehouse but enjoy a cold one, strike up conversations with the friendly bartenders and fellow customers, and watch the world zoom by. And that's just the point. Icehouses were once common along southern U.S.

As a nod to Houston’s long history with the railroad, the Houston Astros new MLB stadium was built on the site occupied by the city’s historic Union Station. Outside Minute Maid Park's left-field wall sits a full-size vintage locomotive running along 800 feet of track.

Willie Wonka has apparently found a new home in Houston at this eye-popping, all-American candy store. Everywhere you look in this chockablock room, there are towering, overflowing displays of the candy you knew as a kid.

Nationally and internationally recognized, the Houston Grand Opera is the only opera company in the world to win a Tony, two Grammy and two Emmy Awards. Committed to commissioning and producing new works, the company has performed more than 40 premieres and six American premieres since 1973.

This limestone warehouse, a mid-century beauty that was once a steel-fan factory, blasted back to life in 1980 as a dance club, with owners promoting it as "the most technologically advanced and mind-blowing in the Southwest." One look at the gyrating bodies of the 20- and 30-somethings on Rich's

Ideal for a quick dinner, creative cocktails, and some of Houston’s best people-watching, this stylish bar is part of the multi-concept RDG + Bar Annie restaurant owned by celebrated chef Robert Del Grande.

Rising improbably from a 22-acre plain in a far-flung and otherwise bleak Houston suburb on the flat Gulf Coast landscape, this is the first traditional temple of its kind in North America, constructed according to ancient Hindu tenets of divine architecture.

Built in 1958, Mies van der Rohe's glass-and-steel pavilion, a renowned example of the International Style pioneered by the architect, changed the look of American museums—and the ways in which art is exhibited.