Honolulu

Restaurants in Honolulu

What One of the last drive-in restaurants in Honolulu, its parking lot is often filled with vans topped with surfboards. Rainbow is a favorite pit stop of beachcombers in flip-flops and office workers hoping to catch some rays on their lunch break.

Named after its location at 3660 Waialae Avenue near the Wilhelmina Rise in East Honolulu, this Euro-Island bistro is a collaboration between Russell Siu and Gale Ogawa.

Surrounded by the lei stands and street merchants of Chinatown, the small, 80-seat Duc’s Bistro is a slightly off-the-beaten path Vietnamese and French eatery that has a faithful following among locals.

Owned by the French-born chef, and James Beard Award-winner, George Mavrothalassitis, the critically-acclaimed Chef Mavro is regarded as one of the finest restaurants in Hawaii.

Located on the second floor of the Waikiki Beach Walk—a large development with restaurants, hotels, and shops—Kaiwa is a teppan-fusion and sushi restaurant operated husband-and-wife restaurateur team Isamu and Motoko Kubota.

Grab a deceptive mai tai at this open-air beachfront bar and restaurant.

This cozy, wood–paneled restaurant may look like scores of other places in Honolulu, but chef-owner Manabu Kikuchi’s izakaya (Japanese tapas-style cooking) and impeccably fresh sushi are unrivaled. We loved: Spicy hamachi tartare.

Shokudo translates to "dining room" in English, and this Honolulu eatery, part traditional Japanese izakaya and part sushi bar, is just that. The popular Japanese chain opened its first U.S.

A Honolulu institution, the Willows was founded by Kathleen Perry and her husband, Al, on July 4, 1944 to help Kathleen’s family maintain their property during the tough economic times of World War II.

What This informal joint in a residential neighborhood east of Waikiki is a takeout favorite.

 

Posh hotel restaurant and lounge. On Friday and Saturday nights, the W hotel's Diamond Head Grill transforms into the Wonder Lounge, a multi-bar club with DJs and dancing.

A hole in the wall in nearly every sense of the word, Mitsu-Ken Okazu & Catering is, essentially, a nondescript, off the beaten path, shack.

Specializing in the traditional Japanese noodle dish, oden, Hakkei is an outpost of an onsen ryokan (hot spring inn) restaurant of the same name located in the town of Yubara, Japan. The original restaurant in Japan is overseen by chef Seiya Masahara, a Japanese culinary giant,

Owner Ed Kenney composts with a worm bin, then uses the fertilizer on the greenery outside of Downtown.