Honolulu

Restaurants in Honolulu

Honolulu restaurants run the gamut from laid-back authentic to innovative Hawaiian to more familiar global chains. Our recommendation is to skip the chains altogether and start with more sophisticated spots such as Alan Wong's, widely considered one of the best restaurants in Honolulu. Here, the service is impeccable, the atmosphere is warm, and the prices are reasonable. Locally sourced fish and other ingredients make it popular among locals and the space itself is fairly small, so be sure to book in advance.
But the city's tinier ethnic eateries are also worth your time. For example, despite its name, the nearby Little Village Noodle Shop is anything but ordinary. This Honolulu restaurant applies modern skill to traditional Chinese-style cooking in Honolulu's Chinatown district. The portions of are perfectly sized and expertly prepared. Because there are so many options for eating out, one good rule of thumb when choosing among restaurants in Honolulu is to opt for those specializing in Asia- and Polynesia-inspired dishes anchored by ahi tuna, Filipino pork adobo, and more.

Posh hotel restaurant and lounge. On Friday and Saturday nights, the W hotel's Diamond Head Grill transforms into the Wonder Lounge, a multi-bar club with DJs and dancing.

Owner Ed Kenney composts with a worm bin, then uses the fertilizer on the greenery outside of Downtown.

Blending cuisine and wine, Vino is the brainchild of two of Hawaii’s most influential culinary personalities, restauranteur D.K.

European transplants Donato Loperfido and Philippe Padovani shuttered their eponymous local restaurants before teaming up in 2008 to open ’Elua, whose name means “two” in Hawaiian. The concept: two distinct, seasonal French and Italian menus for mixing and matching.

A unique, alternative to the abundant Hawaiian fare on Oahu, the 12th Avenue Grill serves modern twists on classic American dishes. The small restaurant has only 14 tables filled with diners who come for its inventive menu. Popular selections include grilled Maui Cattle Co.

A joint venture between chef Hiroshi Fukui and master sommelier Chuck Furuya, Hiroshi Eurasian Tapas was established to showcase Fukui’s skill at preparing Japanese cuisine and Furuya’s talent for pairing wines with Asian fare.

Located inside the Waikiki Parc Hotel, this upscale Japanese-Peruvian fusion restaurant is part of an international chain owned by world-renowned chef Nobu Matsuhisa.

Henry Adaniya might be the city’s most improbable new restaurateur. He closed his acclaimed Chicago restaurant Trio—where chefs Rick Tramonto and Grant Achatz made their names—to bring the upscale hot dog craze to Honolulu in 2007.

Located on the fourth floor of the Ala Moana Center, Tsukiji Fish Market is part restaurant and part market.

Surrounded by the lei stands and street merchants of Chinatown, the small, 80-seat Duc’s Bistro is a slightly off-the-beaten path Vietnamese and French eatery that has a faithful following among locals.

Grab a deceptive mai tai at this open-air beachfront bar and restaurant.

This cozy, wood–paneled restaurant may look like scores of other places in Honolulu, but chef-owner Manabu Kikuchi’s izakaya (Japanese tapas-style cooking) and impeccably fresh sushi are unrivaled. We loved: Spicy hamachi tartare.

A Honolulu institution, the Willows was founded by Kathleen Perry and her husband, Al, on July 4, 1944 to help Kathleen’s family maintain their property during the tough economic times of World War II.

A hole in the wall in nearly every sense of the word, Mitsu-Ken Okazu & Catering is, essentially, a nondescript, off the beaten path, shack.

D.K. Kodama, a third-generation Japanese American, founded this Asian-fusion restaurant, whose name translates in Japanese to “third generation.” Know for its eclectic cuisine and inventive sushi, Sansei opened in Maui in 1996, and has now expanded to four locations throughout Hawaii.