Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

This city has experienced a culinary explosion and today the glut of excellent restaurants in Hong Kong can feel overwhelming. There are sleek top-floor spots with stunning city views to noisy, hole-in-the-wall noodle joints, and everything in between. One of the best restaurants in Hong Kong is the Chairman, but be sure to make reservations at least three weeks in advance. Thanks to discreet vibe, outstanding food, and reasonable prices, tables book quickly. More casual restaurants are now preparing dishes to rival those of their fancier peers. One of the best is On Lot 10, a small, unassuming French restaurant whose chef has worked alongside Alain Ducasse and prefers to shop at local markets for the seasonal ingredients he uses to prepare his dishes. But there are enough Hong Kong restaurants that everyone can find something they love to eat, whether it's Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, or Indian. Our recommendation? Stick with classic Chinese.

Atop the gaudy Sheraton hotel in Kowloon, the Oyster & Wine Bar sells 800 oysters a day, and imports them from all over the planet.

The spirit of old Hong Kong is brought to life in this teahouse that's known as much for its dim sum as for tea. Visistor take a step back into the 1930’s in this Art Deco central district spot: marble tables, wood booths, stained glass, and paneling surround fill the space.

Finally, Hong Kong has a premier waterfront restaurant with a view of Victoria Harbour, complete with a 270-degree panorama of Kowloon Peninsula. Ask to eat in the private upstairs dining room; it doubles as a wine cellar.

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A spacious, wood-accented respite from the bustling departures area, this café offers dramatic views over the runways and the South China Sea, and live jazz music on most nights.

This controversial restaurant serving molecular cuisine originated as one of Hong Kong’s storied private kitchens and then morphed into what it is today: a space-age terraced room looking out on the back of an unspectacular building.

This sleek Japanese bar and dining room lets patrons walk the runway that separates the restaurant and bar areas. Part of the Aqua restaurant group, this hip Times Square location is decorated in gold, red, and black; the catwalk is gold, and the Lipstick Lounge’s color is bright shades of red.

At this pint-sized restauarant chef-owner Que Vinh Dang, who has worked for Rocco DiSpirito and Geoffrey Zakarian, injects playful Americana into his set menu with riffs on alphabet soup and sloppy joes.

Owner Lau Kin Wai once critiqued the work of artists; now he scrutinizes culinary art and invites diners to form their own opinion of the Cantonese fare at his Tin Hau neighborhood restaurant.

Cantonese dim sum, seafood, and Shanghai-style fare are served in the banquet-style dining room of this Wan Chai-area restaurant.

Come for the homey black-and-white-tiled space and two-inch-thick toast topped with silky, plush scrambled eggs (corned beef hash optional). Locals also love the café’s macaroni-and-ham soup for breakfast, but don’t feel obliged to follow suit.

The menu here is worth the harrowing squeeze into the tiny dining room.

Located on the second floor of the Intercontinental Hotel, this Japanese restaurant takes its namesake from chef Nobu Matsuhisa. Japanese design elements dominate the interior, including the ceiling that resembles sea urchin texture and a cherry blossom motif at the bar.

Not all of Hong Kong’s notable restaurants are in the heart of the city; this one—famous for its fresh, reasonably priced seafood—is located in the fishing village of Sai Kung, northeast of the metropolis.