Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

Located on the second floor of the Intercontinental Hotel, this Japanese restaurant takes its namesake from chef Nobu Matsuhisa. Japanese design elements dominate the interior, including the ceiling that resembles sea urchin texture and a cherry blossom motif at the bar.

Not all of Hong Kong’s notable restaurants are in the heart of the city; this one—famous for its fresh, reasonably priced seafood—is located in the fishing village of Sai Kung, northeast of the metropolis.

The menu here is worth the harrowing squeeze into the tiny dining room.

The über-chic modern dining room and towering, panoramic harbor views are stunning, but the cuisine—half Japanese, half Italian—is just as bold, with a structural integrity that gives the vistas a run for their money.

At the entrance to this popular Italian eatery, a large oven churns out batch after batch of the restaurant's eponymous dish: homemade breadsticks (grissini in Italian).

One of Hong Kong’s biggest bakery chains built its reputation on its oval-shaped version of the egg tart, but its array of sweet and savory delights also includes single-serving cream-topped cakes, fruit pastries, and soft butter-glazed buns.

This venue is closed.

This convention center–size favorite is still everything you want: bustle, extended families, and a never-ending parade of steaming carts proferring crisp taro puffs, steamed king prawns, and chicken feet braised to a dark, burnished tan.

Sichuan fare is known to start a party (or a fire, with the proper seasoning) in your mouth, so have a glass of water at the ready before digging in at this Hung Hom neighborhood restaurant in the Whampoa Garden development.

Even if you arrive well before the 10 a.m. opening, the line will already stretch out the door. Persevere: it leads to the city’s lightest barbecued-pork buns and most supple rice-flour rolls.


Located on the first floor of the Peninsula Hong Kong hotel, this upscale Cantonese restaurant is designed to reflect the history of the Peninsula, which first opened in 1928.

Order the steak tartare and a side of chef Gray Kunz’s signature house-made ketchup or sea bass in ginger bouillon while taking in the amazing harbor views at the ultra-glam dining room atop the Upper House hotel. The $37 lunch prix fixe, which changes seasonally, is a stellar value.

This Sichuan restaurant is well hidden on the sixth floor of a central district business building. It’s no secret though, since it received a Michelin Bib Gourmand in 2011. This small space has only a handful tables and minimal decor, making it clear that it's all about food, not ambience.