Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

This city has experienced a culinary explosion and today the glut of excellent restaurants in Hong Kong can feel overwhelming. There are sleek top-floor spots with stunning city views to noisy, hole-in-the-wall noodle joints, and everything in between. One of the best restaurants in Hong Kong is the Chairman, but be sure to make reservations at least three weeks in advance. Thanks to discreet vibe, outstanding food, and reasonable prices, tables book quickly. More casual restaurants are now preparing dishes to rival those of their fancier peers. One of the best is On Lot 10, a small, unassuming French restaurant whose chef has worked alongside Alain Ducasse and prefers to shop at local markets for the seasonal ingredients he uses to prepare his dishes. But there are enough Hong Kong restaurants that everyone can find something they love to eat, whether it's Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, or Indian. Our recommendation? Stick with classic Chinese.

The straightforward fast-food menu of Chinese comfort staples here includes congee rice porridge with chicken, fried tofu with scallions (an ideal savory breakfast), wonton soup with scallops, barbecue pork, and choy sum vegetables in hot broth.

The second outpost of London restaurateur Rainer Becker, this contemporary Japanese hot spot opened to huge fanfare in June 2007.

Located on the third level of the International Finance Center Mall, this upscale restaurant serves classic Italian fare amid panoramic views of Victoria Harbour.

The 25th floor of the Mandarin Oriental offers a taste of contemporary French fare from well-known chef Pierre Gagnaire. Chef de cuisine Nicolas Boujema (a student of Gagnaire) leads the culinary efforts, earning the restaurant two Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012.

The restaurant, overlooking the harbor, serves delightful sweet barbecued pork buns, steamed rice-flour cannelloni with diced scallop and crabmeat, and crispy spring rolls with shredded chicken and the glorious zing of pickles.

While the restaurant’s name refers to an old alley or lane, nothing could be further from reality. Dark tones, dramatic lighting, red lanterns, and panoramic views set the tone inside this 28th-floor location. The fare is northern Chinese, but made into Hutong trademarks with novel ingredients.

At the 16-seat counter at the industrial-chic restaurant diners watch Jean Georges–trained chef Makoto Ono prepare a seven-course omakase meal in an open kitchen.

Starbucks’s local competitor—founded by a Seattle expat—can also serve a great cup o’ joe a hundred different ways. For the peckish, there’s a decent selection of pastries, scones, and cookies. Java addicts, take note: one of the two locations on Level 7 is open 24 hours.

This airy, hushed dining room, with its plush chairs and small pond fed by a tinkling waterfall, is the place to linger over lunch in Wan Chai.