Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

This city has experienced a culinary explosion and today the glut of excellent restaurants in Hong Kong can feel overwhelming. There are sleek top-floor spots with stunning city views to noisy, hole-in-the-wall noodle joints, and everything in between. One of the best restaurants in Hong Kong is the Chairman, but be sure to make reservations at least three weeks in advance. Thanks to discreet vibe, outstanding food, and reasonable prices, tables book quickly. More casual restaurants are now preparing dishes to rival those of their fancier peers. One of the best is On Lot 10, a small, unassuming French restaurant whose chef has worked alongside Alain Ducasse and prefers to shop at local markets for the seasonal ingredients he uses to prepare his dishes. But there are enough Hong Kong restaurants that everyone can find something they love to eat, whether it's Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, or Indian. Our recommendation? Stick with classic Chinese.

Located in the city's SoHo district, Lotus is self-labeled as modern Thai. The front of the restaurant is open-air, making it great for watching the crowds, while the exposed brick and high ceilings are reminiscent of a big-city loft.

Owned by world-famous chef Alain Ducasse, this Michelin two-starred restaurant is located on the ground floor of the InterContinental Hotel, overlooking Victoria Harbour.

The revamped Hyatt Regency Tsim Sha Tsui houses Hugo’s, a stalwart restaurant favored by the city’s power brokers. On the menu: standards such as lobster bisque and steak tartare, prepared tableside.

Kowloon may not be the first place you’d expect to find Nordic seafood, but “Food, Ideas, Nightlife, Drinks, and Service” aims to provide sea-dwelling fare from Finland, Iceland, Norway, Denmark and Sweden.

Try Cantonese classics such as tea-smoked chicken and barbecued pork belly in the sleek, harbor-facing dining room.

The lonely expat from Italy needn’t look far for a taste of the homeland, since this Causeway Bay restaurant brings in fresh ingredients from Rome on a weekly basis. Diners don’t go for the ambience or presentation, as neither are emphasized.

This leisurely coffee shop is Asia’s answer to Starbucks; sip tea, sit under slow-moving wooden fans and imagine the Repulse Bay beach scene 80 years ago.

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Dragon-i draws a seemingly endless parade of models and A-list celebrities, with past guests including David Beckham, Jude Law, and Naomi Campbell.

The M Bar at the Mandarin Oriental hotel allows you to gaze straight down onto the harbor from the 25th floor. The Earl Grey “mar-tea-ni,” rimmed with sugar and salt and infused with orange, is a clever mix of strong booze and light caffeine and the perfect way to regain focus.

This ground-floor restaurant in the Star Street district showcases owner Jacky Yu’s love for food and arts, not just with desserts like the moniker suggests, but also with savory Chinese-fusion dishes. The dining area has light woods accents contrasted with red walls.

Americans may not happily push their bowl of Lucky Charms aside for rice porridge, but in Hong Kong congee is the breakfast of champions.

A team of Japanese chefs prepare robatayaki, or grilled meats and seafood, in this atmospheric, lantern-lit restaurant, located ina 19th-century lighthouse. Standouts include Yamaguchi chicken, Kagoshima pork, and Australian Wagyu sirloin skewers.

Central Hong Kong neighborhood restaurant Goccia serves Southern Italian cuisine. The bi-level eatery has ambient lighting, panoramic picture windows, orange leather chairs, and banquette seating on the main floor. Outdoor terrace dining is also available.