Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

This city has experienced a culinary explosion and today the glut of excellent restaurants in Hong Kong can feel overwhelming. There are sleek top-floor spots with stunning city views to noisy, hole-in-the-wall noodle joints, and everything in between. One of the best restaurants in Hong Kong is the Chairman, but be sure to make reservations at least three weeks in advance. Thanks to discreet vibe, outstanding food, and reasonable prices, tables book quickly. More casual restaurants are now preparing dishes to rival those of their fancier peers. One of the best is On Lot 10, a small, unassuming French restaurant whose chef has worked alongside Alain Ducasse and prefers to shop at local markets for the seasonal ingredients he uses to prepare his dishes. But there are enough Hong Kong restaurants that everyone can find something they love to eat, whether it's Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, or Indian. Our recommendation? Stick with classic Chinese.

For a brief pit stop try Olala Charcuterie, where you can score a refreshing salad with extra-lean Serrano ham and an undercurrent of beets. Sturdier dishes include an oxtail stewed with red wine and vegetables and a lusty boeuf bourguignon.

Yes, it’s a little on the touristy side—okay, more than a little—but this sprawling restaurant atop Victoria Peak is well worth a visit for its unmatchable nighttime views over the city.

Yu

Have a romantic dinner at this delightful spot tucked into a 1914 heritage building. An advertising executive turned Slow Food diva, owner Margaret Xu grows her own organic vegetables, makes fresh tofu, and grinds the flour for her slippery rice cakes.

A spacious, wood-accented respite from the bustling departures area, this café offers dramatic views over the runways and the South China Sea, and live jazz music on most nights.

Finally, Hong Kong has a premier waterfront restaurant with a view of Victoria Harbour, complete with a 270-degree panorama of Kowloon Peninsula. Ask to eat in the private upstairs dining room; it doubles as a wine cellar.

Kee

Located on the second floor of the Intercontinental Hotel, this Japanese restaurant takes its namesake from chef Nobu Matsuhisa. Japanese design elements dominate the interior, including the ceiling that resembles sea urchin texture and a cherry blossom motif at the bar.

Not all of Hong Kong’s notable restaurants are in the heart of the city; this one—famous for its fresh, reasonably priced seafood—is located in the fishing village of Sai Kung, northeast of the metropolis.

The menu here is worth the harrowing squeeze into the tiny dining room.

This convention center–size favorite is still everything you want: bustle, extended families, and a never-ending parade of steaming carts proferring crisp taro puffs, steamed king prawns, and chicken feet braised to a dark, burnished tan.