Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

This city has experienced a culinary explosion and today the glut of excellent restaurants in Hong Kong can feel overwhelming. There are sleek top-floor spots with stunning city views to noisy, hole-in-the-wall noodle joints, and everything in between. One of the best restaurants in Hong Kong is the Chairman, but be sure to make reservations at least three weeks in advance. Thanks to discreet vibe, outstanding food, and reasonable prices, tables book quickly. More casual restaurants are now preparing dishes to rival those of their fancier peers. One of the best is On Lot 10, a small, unassuming French restaurant whose chef has worked alongside Alain Ducasse and prefers to shop at local markets for the seasonal ingredients he uses to prepare his dishes. But there are enough Hong Kong restaurants that everyone can find something they love to eat, whether it's Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, or Indian. Our recommendation? Stick with classic Chinese.

Go to the 25th floor of the Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong, for the sweeping views and gold-plated dim sum such as Wagyu beef–and–black pepper puffs and foie gras-and-prawn rolls.

Located on the second floor of Cosmo Hotel Mongkok, this cinema-inspired eatery is named after the Italian film studio that produced the work of renowned director Federico Fellini.

This chain of uncomplicated Singapore-originated restaurants manages to do just about everything right. Feast on standards such as lobster with ginger and scallion, a near-perfect Peking duck and barbecued pork.

Witness the 1940’s ambience, retro chandeliers, and gray-haired servers at the new but oh-so-old-world restaurant. Flower crab steeped in aged Chinese wine and funky minced pork–and–salted fish patties are just some of the standouts on the seasonal Cantonese menu.

This restaurant on the sixth floor of the Four Seasons Hong Kong has established itself as a French cuisine authority in Hong Kong, earning three Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012.

Founder Kam Shui Fai’s reputation for roasted goose began at his humble street-side food stall before the onset of World War II. From that beginning grew the business that would one day earn the chef a Michelin star three years in a row.

From the lightly provocative art by Mao Tong Qiang (the iconic Iwo Jima soldiers hoisting a gigantic dollar symbol instead of the Stars and Stripes) to the timber-paneled red-wine cellar to the burgundy velvet armchairs to the sleek Laguiole knives to the soon-to-come rooftop garden (cigars!), Cé

For a brief pit stop try Olala Charcuterie, where you can score a refreshing salad with extra-lean Serrano ham and an undercurrent of beets. Sturdier dishes include an oxtail stewed with red wine and vegetables and a lusty boeuf bourguignon.