Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

Sichuan fare is known to start a party (or a fire, with the proper seasoning) in your mouth, so have a glass of water at the ready before digging in at this Hung Hom neighborhood restaurant in the Whampoa Garden development.

Even if you arrive well before the 10 a.m. opening, the line will already stretch out the door. Persevere: it leads to the city’s lightest barbecued-pork buns and most supple rice-flour rolls.

This convention center–size favorite is still everything you want: bustle, extended families, and a never-ending parade of steaming carts proferring crisp taro puffs, steamed king prawns, and chicken feet braised to a dark, burnished tan.

Order the steak tartare and a side of chef Gray Kunz’s signature house-made ketchup or sea bass in ginger bouillon while taking in the amazing harbor views at the ultra-glam dining room atop the Upper House hotel. The $37 lunch prix fixe, which changes seasonally, is a stellar value.

Y's

Located on the first floor of the Peninsula Hong Kong hotel, this upscale Cantonese restaurant is designed to reflect the history of the Peninsula, which first opened in 1928.

This Sichuan restaurant is well hidden on the sixth floor of a central district business building. It’s no secret though, since it received a Michelin Bib Gourmand in 2011. This small space has only a handful tables and minimal decor, making it clear that it's all about food, not ambience.

Similar to an American speakeasy, this gourmet Chinese restaurant is part of a local culinary tradition known as a “private kitchen,” a secretive, largely unadvertised restaurant hidden away in a nondescript location.

Money, food, and gossip fuel Hong Kong, and you can find a nice combination of the three at the Golden Valley restaurant at the Emperor Hotel, in Happy Valley.

In Vietnamese, Song means "to live,” and this central district restaurant gives life to Indochinese and Vietnamese fare. The interior is casual but intimate with comfortable chairs and soft light.

Soup noodles with braised brisket, sweet spices, and tangerine peel is a steal at just $2.

This extensive salad buffet is ideal for scoring healthy pre-flight nibbles. There’s plenty of self-seating for those with time to spare, while travelers on the run can grab soups and noodles, and desserts such as a Japanese-style cheesecake.

“Only natural” is the mission at this Causeway Bay spot that specializes in bread, coffee, and snacks. MSG, additives and colorings are shunned by the bakers; natural ingredients alone go into loaves of cheese yoghurt and raisin sourdough bread.