Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

This city has experienced a culinary explosion and today the glut of excellent restaurants in Hong Kong can feel overwhelming. There are sleek top-floor spots with stunning city views to noisy, hole-in-the-wall noodle joints, and everything in between. One of the best restaurants in Hong Kong is the Chairman, but be sure to make reservations at least three weeks in advance. Thanks to discreet vibe, outstanding food, and reasonable prices, tables book quickly. More casual restaurants are now preparing dishes to rival those of their fancier peers. One of the best is On Lot 10, a small, unassuming French restaurant whose chef has worked alongside Alain Ducasse and prefers to shop at local markets for the seasonal ingredients he uses to prepare his dishes. But there are enough Hong Kong restaurants that everyone can find something they love to eat, whether it's Korean, Thai, Vietnamese, or Indian. Our recommendation? Stick with classic Chinese.

“Only natural” is the mission at this Causeway Bay spot that specializes in bread, coffee, and snacks. MSG, additives and colorings are shunned by the bakers; natural ingredients alone go into loaves of cheese yoghurt and raisin sourdough bread.

Babbo alumnus Vinny Lauria serves hearty Italian standards—beef carpaccio; bucatini all’amatriciana; Neapolitan-style pizza—against a backdrop of toile-patterned walls and solid walnut floors.

It doesn’t take much sleuthing to discover the specialty of this Causeway Bay restaurant; the name should be a giveaway to crustacean-seeking diners.

Some say the bay was named after the British navy’s repulsing of squatter pirates, while others claim a ship inspired the moniker. Whatever the origin, this area of Hong Kong's Southern District is now home to pricey apartments, expensive restaurants, and upscale shopping.

Former organic farmer Tam Keung puts a locavore spin on rice porridge. The fish are raised in his pond and the soy sauce is house-made.

The famous Longjing tea leaves from the Hangzhou region make the stir-fried freshwater shrimp taste sweet and earthy, but the star of the show is missing from the English side of the menu—the smoked yellow croaker, an unremarkable, bottom-dwelling creature that, in the hands of the Tin Heung Lau

This is the only restaurant in Hong Kong to get three stars from the 2009 Michelin guide, and the locals were not all pleased. Sample harangue: “These French [Michelin] people, what do they understand? They only care about the view.

There’s no need to settle for one culinary style at this vast international buffet, located on the seventh floor of the Island Shangri-La hotel.

The long menu of à la carte Cantonese dishes here includes Chinese-style chicken soup and stir-fried scallops with vegetables in zesty XO sauce. Dim sum fanatics can get their fix with choices like pork and mushroom dumplings and steamed pork buns.

Go to the 25th floor of the Mandarin Oriental, Hong Kong, for the sweeping views and gold-plated dim sum such as Wagyu beef–and–black pepper puffs and foie gras-and-prawn rolls.