Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

Hong Kong is where it all comes together-at the city's high-end oyster bars (a favorite of mainland Chinese visitors), you'll find specimens from all over the world.

Drawing such former guests as Jackie Chan, this Michelin two-starred restaurant serves gourmet Cantonese cuisine inside the Langham Hong Kong hotel.

The spirit of old Hong Kong is brought to life in this teahouse that's known as much for its dim sum as for tea. Visistor take a step back into the 1930’s in this Art Deco central district spot: marble tables, wood booths, stained glass, and paneling surround fill the space.

Atop the gaudy Sheraton hotel in Kowloon, the Oyster & Wine Bar sells 800 oysters a day, and imports them from all over the planet.

Finally, Hong Kong has a premier waterfront restaurant with a view of Victoria Harbour, complete with a 270-degree panorama of Kowloon Peninsula. Ask to eat in the private upstairs dining room; it doubles as a wine cellar.


A spacious, wood-accented respite from the bustling departures area, this café offers dramatic views over the runways and the South China Sea, and live jazz music on most nights.

This controversial restaurant serving molecular cuisine originated as one of Hong Kong’s storied private kitchens and then morphed into what it is today: a space-age terraced room looking out on the back of an unspectacular building.

This sleek Japanese bar and dining room lets patrons walk the runway that separates the restaurant and bar areas. Part of the Aqua restaurant group, this hip Times Square location is decorated in gold, red, and black; the catwalk is gold, and the Lipstick Lounge’s color is bright shades of red.

At this pint-sized restauarant chef-owner Que Vinh Dang, who has worked for Rocco DiSpirito and Geoffrey Zakarian, injects playful Americana into his set menu with riffs on alphabet soup and sloppy joes.

Come for the homey black-and-white-tiled space and two-inch-thick toast topped with silky, plush scrambled eggs (corned beef hash optional). Locals also love the café’s macaroni-and-ham soup for breakfast, but don’t feel obliged to follow suit.

Owner Lau Kin Wai once critiqued the work of artists; now he scrutinizes culinary art and invites diners to form their own opinion of the Cantonese fare at his Tin Hau neighborhood restaurant.