Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

This Sichuan restaurant is well hidden on the sixth floor of a central district business building. It’s no secret though, since it received a Michelin Bib Gourmand in 2011. This small space has only a handful tables and minimal decor, making it clear that it's all about food, not ambience.

Similar to an American speakeasy, this gourmet Chinese restaurant is part of a local culinary tradition known as a “private kitchen,” a secretive, largely unadvertised restaurant hidden away in a nondescript location.

Money, food, and gossip fuel Hong Kong, and you can find a nice combination of the three at the Golden Valley restaurant at the Emperor Hotel, in Happy Valley.

In Vietnamese, Song means "to live,” and this central district restaurant gives life to Indochinese and Vietnamese fare. The interior is casual but intimate with comfortable chairs and soft light.

Soup noodles with braised brisket, sweet spices, and tangerine peel is a steal at just $2.

This extensive salad buffet is ideal for scoring healthy pre-flight nibbles. There’s plenty of self-seating for those with time to spare, while travelers on the run can grab soups and noodles, and desserts such as a Japanese-style cheesecake.

“Only natural” is the mission at this Causeway Bay spot that specializes in bread, coffee, and snacks. MSG, additives and colorings are shunned by the bakers; natural ingredients alone go into loaves of cheese yoghurt and raisin sourdough bread.

Babbo alumnus Vinny Lauria serves hearty Italian standards—beef carpaccio; bucatini all’amatriciana; Neapolitan-style pizza—against a backdrop of toile-patterned walls and solid walnut floors.

Some say the bay was named after the British navy’s repulsing of squatter pirates, while others claim a ship inspired the moniker. Whatever the origin, this area of Hong Kong's Southern District is now home to pricey apartments, expensive restaurants, and upscale shopping.

Former organic farmer Tam Keung puts a locavore spin on rice porridge. The fish are raised in his pond and the soy sauce is house-made.

It doesn’t take much sleuthing to discover the specialty of this Causeway Bay restaurant; the name should be a giveaway to crustacean-seeking diners.

This is the only restaurant in Hong Kong to get three stars from the 2009 Michelin guide, and the locals were not all pleased. Sample harangue: “These French [Michelin] people, what do they understand? They only care about the view.