Hong Kong

Restaurants in Hong Kong

Owner Lau Kin Wai once critiqued the work of artists; now he scrutinizes culinary art and invites diners to form their own opinion of the Cantonese fare at his Tin Hau neighborhood restaurant.

Cantonese dim sum, seafood, and Shanghai-style fare are served in the banquet-style dining room of this Wan Chai-area restaurant.

Come for the homey black-and-white-tiled space and two-inch-thick toast topped with silky, plush scrambled eggs (corned beef hash optional). Locals also love the café’s macaroni-and-ham soup for breakfast, but don’t feel obliged to follow suit.

The menu here is worth the harrowing squeeze into the tiny dining room.

Located on the second floor of the Intercontinental Hotel, this Japanese restaurant takes its namesake from chef Nobu Matsuhisa. Japanese design elements dominate the interior, including the ceiling that resembles sea urchin texture and a cherry blossom motif at the bar.

Not all of Hong Kong’s notable restaurants are in the heart of the city; this one—famous for its fresh, reasonably priced seafood—is located in the fishing village of Sai Kung, northeast of the metropolis.

The über-chic modern dining room and towering, panoramic harbor views are stunning, but the cuisine—half Japanese, half Italian—is just as bold, with a structural integrity that gives the vistas a run for their money.

At the entrance to this popular Italian eatery, a large oven churns out batch after batch of the restaurant's eponymous dish: homemade breadsticks (grissini in Italian).

One of Hong Kong’s biggest bakery chains built its reputation on its oval-shaped version of the egg tart, but its array of sweet and savory delights also includes single-serving cream-topped cakes, fruit pastries, and soft butter-glazed buns.

This venue is closed.

This convention center–size favorite is still everything you want: bustle, extended families, and a never-ending parade of steaming carts proferring crisp taro puffs, steamed king prawns, and chicken feet braised to a dark, burnished tan.

Sichuan fare is known to start a party (or a fire, with the proper seasoning) in your mouth, so have a glass of water at the ready before digging in at this Hung Hom neighborhood restaurant in the Whampoa Garden development.