This restaurant on the sixth floor of the Four Seasons Hong Kong has established itself as a French cuisine authority in Hong Kong, earning three Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012.

Founder Kam Shui Fai’s reputation for roasted goose began at his humble street-side food stall before the onset of World War II. From that beginning grew the business that would one day earn the chef a Michelin star three years in a row.

Witness the 1940’s ambience, retro chandeliers, and gray-haired servers at the new but oh-so-old-world restaurant. Flower crab steeped in aged Chinese wine and funky minced pork–and–salted fish patties are just some of the standouts on the seasonal Cantonese menu.

The 25th floor of the Mandarin Oriental offers a taste of contemporary French fare from well-known chef Pierre Gagnaire. Chef de cuisine Nicolas Boujema (a student of Gagnaire) leads the culinary efforts, earning the restaurant two Michelin stars in 2011 and 2012.

The restaurant, overlooking the harbor, serves delightful sweet barbecued pork buns, steamed rice-flour cannelloni with diced scallop and crabmeat, and crispy spring rolls with shredded chicken and the glorious zing of pickles.

This leisurely coffee shop is Asia’s answer to Starbucks; sip tea, sit under slow-moving wooden fans and imagine the Repulse Bay beach scene 80 years ago.

Part restaurant and part nightclub, Dragon-i draws a seemingly endless parade of models and A-list celebrities, with past guests including David Beckham, Jude Law, and Naomi Campbell.

The M Bar at the Mandarin Oriental hotel allows you to gaze straight down onto the harbor from the 25th floor. The Earl Grey “mar-tea-ni,” rimmed with sugar and salt and infused with orange, is a clever mix of strong booze and light caffeine and the perfect way to regain focus.

From the lightly provocative art by Mao Tong Qiang (the iconic Iwo Jima soldiers hoisting a gigantic dollar symbol instead of the Stars and Stripes) to the timber-paneled red-wine cellar to the burgundy velvet armchairs to the sleek Laguiole knives to the soon-to-come rooftop garden (cigars!), Cé

At the 16-seat counter at the industrial-chic restaurant diners watch Jean Georges–trained chef Makoto Ono prepare a seven-course omakase meal in an open kitchen.

While the restaurant’s name refers to an old alley or lane, nothing could be further from reality. Dark tones, dramatic lighting, red lanterns, and panoramic views set the tone inside this 28th-floor location. The fare is northern Chinese, but made into Hutong trademarks with novel ingredients.