Hong Kong International Airport (HKG)

Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) Travel Guide

Near Gate 20, next to Chanel, Tiffany & Co.’s first airport shop has a well-vetted selection of silver jewelry and fashion accessories, including sterling rings, earrings, and pendants from the Tiffany Signature collection.

A mini-amusement park for flight enthusiasts, this museum’s interactive rides include a plane-cabin ride simulator.

This Japanese chain of no-frills, high-design home and accessories stores stocks just about everything a traveler could want. The many flight-friendly items include neck pillows, digital alarm clocks, toiletry kits, and a variety of totes, luggage, and satchels.

Only London’s Heathrow and Paris’ Charles de Gaulle are busier than this airport, which saw almost 51 million passengers in 2010. HKIA opened in 1998, and Terminal 2 was inaugurated in 2007. Shaped like a “Y,” this two-runway space on Lantau Island is near the Pearl River Delta region.

No matter what ails you, you’ll find an herbal antidote in this shop’s seemingly endless collection of Chinese teas.

If your travel plans allow for just a few hours’ stopover in Hong Kong, tours with Vigor Tours Ltd. give you a quick-and-dirty overview of the city’s highlights.

The Pen’s elegantly branded boutique chocolates have become a cult favorite among fans of the city’s most famous luxury hotel.

Cathay Pacific’s 1,980-square-foot lounge has minimalist interiors by renowned British designer John Pawson; passengers can reserve one of eight private bathroom suites, which have black-and-white veined marble walls.

Golfers on layover can practice their swing at Hong Kong’s first nine-hole golf course, conveniently located at the AsiaWorld-Expo adjacent to Terminal 2.

Media Asia Entertainment Group, one of Asia’s biggest Chinese-language film producers, showcases the local movie industry with this series of ongoing interactive exhibits—including one where you can shoot your own movie in front of a blue screen.

Ancient China gets a 21st-century twist in the clothing, accessories, and housewares lines of this Hong Kong–born brand. Bold shades of magenta, lime, and aqua spice up traditional cheongsam dresses, while ancient scholar’s robes are reinterpreted in leather.

Asia’s largest 4-D projection screen—a 360-seat theater where films come not only with 3-D glasses but also special effects such as wind, fog, water spray, and bubbles—happens to be right here in Hong Kong’s airport.

The beauty line’s first airport retail boutique is a spacious 2,669 square feet and stocks Armani’s signature cosmetics, perfumes, and skincare products.

Here’s one way to stretch your legs (or just tucker yourself out) before a long flight: hit this virtual-reality arcade for a few rounds of full-body, computer-simulated sports like soccer, boxing, basketball, or skiing.